• Land Treatment for Primary Sewage Effluent: Water and Energy Conservation

      Rice, R. C.; Gilbert, R. G.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1978-04-15)
      Land treatment of secondary municipal wastewater is an economical and aesthetic method of upgrading water quality, if hydrologic and geologic conditions are favorable. Costly conventional secondary treatment, which requires large quantities of electrical energy, can be bypassed by applying the primary effluent directly to the land. Soil- denitrifying bacteria use the organic carbon in the primary effluent as an energy source for biodenitrification and nitrogen removal. Laboratory and field studies indicated the quality of renovated wastewater meets standards for unrestricted irrigation and recreational uses. Considerable savings, both in capital and energy costs, can be realized by land treatment of primary effluent.
    • Salvaging Wasted Waters for Desert-Household Gardening

      Fink, D. H.; Ehrler, W. L.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1978-04-15)
      With the objective of determining if sufficient water would be salvaged by a typical desert, urban-household from normally wasted sources associated with the lot and household to adequately irrigate a garden and orchard, a 2000 sq ft house on a typical one fifth acre lot in three cities having climates similar to Phoenix, Tucson, or Prescott, Arizona was hypothesized and the amount of water available for yard watering calculated, provided that (1) only rainfall was available, (2) rainfall-runoff from covered areas associated with or adjacent to the lot was salvaged (roof, street, alley etc.), (3) gray-water from the household was utilized, (4) a portion of the lot was waterproofed to concentrate the runoff on the untreated portion, and (5) various combinations of the above were utilized to increase the amount of available water. It is demonstrated that these sources could be used singly or in combination to obtain the required amount of water with the actual amount available depending upon the precipitation, runoff and runon areas, runoff efficiency of the contributing area, and the number of people in the household. A number of horticultural plants are suggested that should best fit such an irregular irrigation scheme.