• A Bibliographic Information System for Water Yield Improvement Practices

      White, Linda M.; Department of Watershed Management, University of Arizona, Tucson (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1974-04-20)
      Effects of vegetation management on water and other renewable natural resources and amenities are subjects of a computerized reference retrieval information system operated out of the department of watershed management, university of Arizona. Although WaMIS (watershed management information system is a subsystem of the arid lands information system, it has its own unique scope. The system, which serves as a link between bibliographic material and users who need access to the information, provides a personalized bibliography for the user in his area of interest. Documents identified as relevant to the system's scope are abstracted and indexed, and references stored in a computer bank. In response to specific inquiries from users, the computer tapes are searched under indexing terms, author, and/or data, and a printout of citations (giving author, data, title, source, abstract, and indexing terms) relevant to the inquiry is sent to the user.
    • Laboratory Evaluation of Water-Repellent Soils for Water Harvesting

      Fink, Dwayne H.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1974-04-20)
      Reported are laboratory evaluations to screen water-repellent materials and treatments before testing them in the field. Water repellency tests were conducted on paraffin wax, a wax emulsion and silicon, lard, and a liquid dust suppressant. Six water repellency tests showed that the high rates of paraffin wax and all rates of the dust suppressant produced highly water-repellent soil surfaces. The six water repellency tests were: (1) the aqueous-alcohol drop test for determination of the 90 degree surface tension for a porous solid, (2) the water drop penetration time test, (3) the relative height of a large sessile water drop resting on the smoothed, treated soil surface, (4) and (5) the presence and persistence of air bubbles trapped between the soil-water interface, and test (6) was made to note whether the large sessile water drop from test (3) would infiltrate the soil or evaporate. Tests (3), (4), and (5) proved the most useful of the six methods for measuring water repellency. Soil type had no significant influence on degree of water repellency as measured in the laboratory by these six tests.