November 20, 2018: Most content in the UA Campus Repository is not accessible using the search/browse functions due to a performance bug; we are actively working to resolve this issue. If you are looking for content you know is in the repository, but cannot get to it, please email us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with your questions and we'll make sure to get the content to you.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPosthumus, Erin Elizabethen_US
dc.creatorPosthumus, Erin Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-14T16:10:33Z
dc.date.available2013-06-14T16:10:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/294022
dc.description.abstractThe modifications animals make to their environments can be critical to species diversity. Red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) create large piles of conifer cone debris (middens) and are hypothesized to function as a keystone species due to positive associations between middens and other vertebrate species. We assessed vegetation and landscape structure at middens with a resident red squirrel for varying consistencies over the prior 5 years and surveyed mammals and birds at the community and population level. After accounting for vegetation and landscape characteristics, red squirrel-created resources positively influenced species richness of medium and large mammals and ground foraging birds, abundance of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and ground foraging birds, and activity of cliff chipmunks (Tamias dorsalis). Increased knowledge of the interaction strength of the red squirrel with its environment may be used to inform decisions in forest management and restoration and offer insight on the conservation value of larderhoarding mammals.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectecosystem engineeren_US
dc.subjectkeystone speciesen_US
dc.subjectlarderhoardingen_US
dc.subjectred squirrelen_US
dc.subjectTamiasciurus hudsonicusen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectdiversityen_US
dc.titleDo Red Squirrel Middens Promote Vertebrate Species Diversity?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMannan, R. Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSteidl, Robert J.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-30T00:41:08Z
html.description.abstractThe modifications animals make to their environments can be critical to species diversity. Red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) create large piles of conifer cone debris (middens) and are hypothesized to function as a keystone species due to positive associations between middens and other vertebrate species. We assessed vegetation and landscape structure at middens with a resident red squirrel for varying consistencies over the prior 5 years and surveyed mammals and birds at the community and population level. After accounting for vegetation and landscape characteristics, red squirrel-created resources positively influenced species richness of medium and large mammals and ground foraging birds, abundance of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and ground foraging birds, and activity of cliff chipmunks (Tamias dorsalis). Increased knowledge of the interaction strength of the red squirrel with its environment may be used to inform decisions in forest management and restoration and offer insight on the conservation value of larderhoarding mammals.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_12756_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
1.996Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record