• 21st Century eTraining: Course Based Online Instruction for Library Employees

      See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis; University Libraries, The University of Arizona; University Libraries, The University of Arizona (2013-11)
      In the Fall of 2012, The Access and Information Services Team (AIST) at the University of Arizona Libraries instituted the use of a Course Management System (CMS) to effectively train both classified staff and student workers in a ubiquitous and self-paced eLearning environment. Through the use of the tools embedded in the CMS along with the creation of self-paced online tutorials and competency based quizzing, the AIST team has significantly reduced staff time allocated to in person training and increased efficiencies in providing uniform circulation, reference, and policy training that is available to students and staff on a 24/7 basis. The training sites provide an all-inclusive environment for both trainees in gaining competency in core skills needed to staff a 24 hour library, as well as for supervisors to be able to effectively track and manage staff and student progress.
    • 21st Century eTraining: Course Based Online Instruction for Library Employees

      See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis; University Libraries, The University of Arizona; University Libraries, The University of Arizona (2013-11)
    • CEnR Community Engaged Research

      Frazier, Stacy; Florida International University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021)
    • Connecting Archival Research and the Classroom

      University of Arizona Libraries; University of Arizona (The University of Arizona., 2013-12-06)
      The University of Arizona Libraries regularly collaborate with departments and groups across campus. In this video, we look at connections between Special Collections and the History Department.
    • Contextualizing Ourselves: The Identity Politics of the Librarian Stereotype

      Pagowsky, Nicole; Rigby, Miriam; University of Arizona Libraries (The Association of College and Research Libraries (Chicago, IL), 2014)
    • Critical Library Pedagogy Handbooks: Acknowledgments

      Pagowsky, Nicole; McElroy, Kelly; University of Arizona; Oregon State University (Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016-09)
    • Critical Library Pedagogy Handbooks: Introduction

      Pagowsky, Nicole; McElroy, Kelly; University of Arizona; Oregon State University (Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016-09)
    • Data Management and Curation: Services and Resources

      Kollen, Christine; Bell, Mary; University of Arizona (2016-10-18)
      Are you or the researchers you work with writing a grant proposal that requires a data management plan? Are you working on a research project and have questions about how to effectively and efficiently manage your research data? Are you interested in sharing your data with other researchers? We can help! For the past several years, the University of Arizona (UA) Libraries, in collaboration with the Office of Research and Discovery and the University Information Technology Services, has been providing data management services and resources to the campus. We are interested in tailoring our services and resources to what you need. We conducted a research data management survey in 2014 and are currently working on the Data Management and Data Curation and Publication (DMDC) pilot. This poster will describe what data management and curation services we are currently providing, and ask for your feedback on potential new data management services and resources.
    • Developing Data Management Services: What Support do Researchers Need?

      Kollen, Christine; University of Arizona (2016-10-18)
      The past several years has seen an increasing emphasis on providing access to the results of research, both publications and data. The majority of federal grant funding agencies require that researchers include a data management plan as part of their grant proposal. In response, the University of Arizona Libraries, in collaboration with the Office of Research and Discovery and the University Information Technology Services, has been providing data management services and resources to the campus for the past several years. In 2014, we conducted a research data management survey to find out how UA researchers manage their research data, determine the demand for existing services and identify new services that UA researchers need. In the fall of 2015, the Data Management and Data Publication and Curation (DMDC) Pilot was started to determine what specific services and tools, including training and support and the needed technology infrastructure, researchers need to effectively and efficiently manage and curate their research data. This presentation will present what data management services we currently are offering, discuss findings from the 2014 survey, and present initial results from the DMDC pilot.
    • Emerging Role of Social Media in Data Sharing and Management

      Ram, Sudha; University of Arizona (2012-10-23)
      This presentation was given at the 2012 Open Access Week program, “The Open Data Revolution: Challenges and Innovations” on October 23, 2012. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Many funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, and journal publishers, such as Nature, require researchers to share data produced during the course of their research. When researchers share their data, other researchers can reuse it to answer new questions, opening up new interpretations and discoveries. Sharing data may also lead to sharing research processes, workflows and tools and may make research articles and papers more useful and citable by others.
    • Ice Ice Baby: Are Librarian Stereotypes Freezing Us Out of Instruction?

      Pagowsky, Nicole; DeFrain, Erica; University of Arizona Libraries (2014-06-03)
      Why do librarians struggle so much with instruction? Part of the problem is that we have so many facets to consider: pedagogy, campus culture, relationships with faculty, and effectiveness with students. Research on student and faculty perceptions of librarians combined with sociological and psychological research on the magnitude of impression effects prompted us to more thoroughly examine how perceptions of instruction librarians impact successful teaching and learning. In this article, we look at theories of impression formation, the historical feminization of librarianship, and suggestions for next steps that we should take in order to take charge of our image and our instruction.
    • Innovation in Health Care Through Open Source Research

      Hurwitz, Bonnie; University of Arizona (2014-02-10)
    • Innovation in Health Care Through Open Source Research

      Hurwitz, Bonnie; University of Arizona (2012-10-23)
      This presentation was given at the 2012 Open Access Week program, “The Open Data Revolution: Challenges and Innovations” on October 23, 2012. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Many funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, and journal publishers, such as Nature, require researchers to share data produced during the course of their research. When researchers share their data, other researchers can reuse it to answer new questions, opening up new interpretations and discoveries. Sharing data may also lead to sharing research processes, workflows and tools and may make research articles and papers more useful and citable by others.
    • Is Cancer Diagnosis Really A "Teachable Moment" for Smoking Cessation?

      Burriss, Jessica L.; University of Kentucky (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2020-01-31)
      Most people assume cancer diagnosis functions as a “teachable moment,” that is, a major life event that triggers a significant increase in people’s motivation to adopt healthy behaviors (e.g., regular exercise, diet high in fresh fruits/veggies) and cease unhealthy behaviors (e.g., heavy alcohol use, medication noncompliance). Conceivably, the power of cancer diagnosis to serve as a “teachable moment” should extend to smoking behavior wherein cancer patients would be expected to quit smoking immediately upon diagnosis and remain abstinent for the balance of their lives. In reality, however, cancer survivors are estimated to smoke at a rate that is equal to or greater than the general population, with subgroups of cancer survivors smoking at much higher rates (40-50%). In my work, I aim to determine if, how, and for whom cancer diagnosis does indeed function as a “teachable moment” for smoking, with a central goal of more fully understanding the naturalistic process by which smoking cessation occurs after a new cancer diagnosis. In this talk, I will examine the interplay between cancer diagnosis and smoking behavior through several different, but complementary research methods, including intensive longitudinal data collection, concurrent mixed methods, randomized clinical trials, and implementation science. Ultimately, this line of research has the goal of promoting smoking cessation among the most vulnerable cancer survivors, including those who report little to no intention to quit and those who are faced with high levels of unmet social support needs.
    • Librarian Contributions in Launching a New Veterinary Medicine College

      Pfander, Jeanne; Cuillier, Cheryl; University of Arizona Libraries (2021-06-16)
      In this presentation we will describe the different roles we have played in working with faculty and administrators through the accreditation and launch of the new College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at the University of Arizona. The liaison librarian played a key role, beginning with gathering information for the Library & Information Resources chapter (Standard 5) of the self-study report for the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education accreditation team’s site visit. Once the college received the Letter of Reasonable Assurance in the accreditation process, the Vet Med liaison librarian and the Open Education Librarian began working in earnest with newly hired faculty. We did multiple onboarding sessions about library services and resources, including free-to-use course materials. CVM wanted to keep course material costs as low as possible, so we provided extensive support in identifying open educational resources and multi-user ebook titles. For Fall 2020, the library was able to provide free access to 38 of 41 required textbooks to CVM students. As the first cohort of students began their studies, we embedded a Library Resources Community in the CVM’s Elentra platform to share resources and to communicate directly with faculty and students.
    • A More Open Future for the Past

      Kansa, Eric; University of California, Berkeley (2011-10-25)
      This presentation was given at the 2011 Open Access Week program, “The Future of Data: Open Access and Reproducibility” on October 25, 2011. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Open Data is the idea that data should be freely available to anyone to use and reuse without access restrictions, licenses, copyright, patents and charges for use.
    • Open Data Challenges in Interdisciplinary Research

      Barton, Jennifer K.; University of Arizona (2012-10-23)
      This presentation was given at the 2012 Open Access Week program, “The Open Data Revolution: Challenges and Innovations” on October 23, 2012. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Many funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, and journal publishers, such as Nature, require researchers to share data produced during the course of their research. When researchers share their data, other researchers can reuse it to answer new questions, opening up new interpretations and discoveries. Sharing data may also lead to sharing research processes, workflows and tools and may make research articles and papers more useful and citable by others.
    • OpenCon 2016

      Laskowski, Casandra; University of Arizona (2016-11-30)
    • Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Bridging the Boundaries of Need and Access to Information Resources

      See, Andrew; University of Arizona (2013-06)
      As the University of Arizona Libraries employ a 21st century user-centered approach to information resource management, we have adopted a Patron-Driven Acquisitions program. Fundamentally, the program is based on the model of users as the drivers of library acquisitions. By embedding order records in the library catalog and by identifying user needs through interlibrary loan requests, the library is able to acquire targeted information resources that more efficiently meet the research needs of our users. This service significantly enhances the user experience and allows the UA Libraries to see greater use of our resources.
    • A Pedagogy of Inquiry

      Pagowsky, Nicole; University of Arizona (2015-11)
      Library instruction continues to evolve. Regardless of the myriad and conflicting opinions academic librarians have about the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, the debates and the document itself have engendered greater discourse surrounding how and why librarians teach. The Framework provides an additional push toward designing instruction with big ideas rather than a skills-based curriculum. However, we still must contend with constraints imposed upon us by higher education taking on business models and enforcing a skills agenda. To enact the pedagogy of the Framework in contrast to changes in higher education presents a challenge. We should consider ways in which the Framework can help us push back against these neoliberal agendas in our pedagogy and reinvent our roles as librarian educators.