• Wrangling Open Educational Resources

      Cuillier, Cheryl; University of Arizona Libraries (2014-11)
      Open educational resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that are free to use, customize, and share. There’s a goldmine of OER online, but locating them is like trying to herd cattle (or cats). It takes persistence and a knack for tracking down things that are scattered all over. OER range from digital textbooks, lesson plans, and games to assignments, videos, and lab notes. Learn about the benefits of OER, potential barriers, where to find high-quality OER, and how to increase customers’ awareness of them. The target audience for this presentation is anyone who works with K-12 classes, college students, instructors, and lifelong learners.
    • Contextualizing Ourselves: The Identity Politics of the Librarian Stereotype

      Pagowsky, Nicole; Rigby, Miriam; University of Arizona Libraries (The Association of College and Research Libraries (Chicago, IL), 2014)
    • Ice Ice Baby: Are Librarian Stereotypes Freezing Us Out of Instruction?

      Pagowsky, Nicole; DeFrain, Erica; University of Arizona Libraries (2014-06-03)
      Why do librarians struggle so much with instruction? Part of the problem is that we have so many facets to consider: pedagogy, campus culture, relationships with faculty, and effectiveness with students. Research on student and faculty perceptions of librarians combined with sociological and psychological research on the magnitude of impression effects prompted us to more thoroughly examine how perceptions of instruction librarians impact successful teaching and learning. In this article, we look at theories of impression formation, the historical feminization of librarianship, and suggestions for next steps that we should take in order to take charge of our image and our instruction.
    • Stewarding the Scholarly Record @ The University of Arizona

      Oxnam, Maliaca; Chapman, Kimberly; Frumkin, Jeremy; University of Arizona Libraries (2015-04-13)
      The University of Arizona (UA) Libraries has an evolving strategy to steward the scholarly record of the institution. As a key component of this strategy the Libraries have a leadership role in implementing UA Vitae, a mandated online faculty activity reporting system with initial focus on supporting the faculty evaluation process. In partnership with the Office of the Provost and Campus Computing, the Libraries contribute expertise in support of this campus initiative. Leveraging the data from this effort to capture a more holistic view of the scholarly record provides opportunities for the Libraries to partner on approaches to utilizing, stewarding, and exposing the scholarly record. This presentation will describe the University and the Library’s evolving strategies in regard to defining and stewarding the scholarly record, our experiences with the build-out of the faculty activity reporting system, and next steps in bringing together information and systems that are transforming our University.
    • Innovation in Health Care Through Open Source Research

      Hurwitz, Bonnie; University of Arizona (2014-02-10)
    • 21st Century eTraining: Course Based Online Instruction for Library Employees

      See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis; University Libraries, The University of Arizona; University Libraries, The University of Arizona (2013-11)
      In the Fall of 2012, The Access and Information Services Team (AIST) at the University of Arizona Libraries instituted the use of a Course Management System (CMS) to effectively train both classified staff and student workers in a ubiquitous and self-paced eLearning environment. Through the use of the tools embedded in the CMS along with the creation of self-paced online tutorials and competency based quizzing, the AIST team has significantly reduced staff time allocated to in person training and increased efficiencies in providing uniform circulation, reference, and policy training that is available to students and staff on a 24/7 basis. The training sites provide an all-inclusive environment for both trainees in gaining competency in core skills needed to staff a 24 hour library, as well as for supervisors to be able to effectively track and manage staff and student progress.
    • 21st Century eTraining: Course Based Online Instruction for Library Employees

      See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis; University Libraries, The University of Arizona; University Libraries, The University of Arizona (2013-11)
    • Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Bridging the Boundaries of Need and Access to Information Resources

      See, Andrew; University of Arizona (2013-06)
      As the University of Arizona Libraries employ a 21st century user-centered approach to information resource management, we have adopted a Patron-Driven Acquisitions program. Fundamentally, the program is based on the model of users as the drivers of library acquisitions. By embedding order records in the library catalog and by identifying user needs through interlibrary loan requests, the library is able to acquire targeted information resources that more efficiently meet the research needs of our users. This service significantly enhances the user experience and allows the UA Libraries to see greater use of our resources.
    • Personalized Library Instruction for 500 of Your Favorite Students: Utilizing Technology in Large Lecture Halls

      Dewland, Jason; Cuillier, Cheryl; DeFrain, Erica; University of Arizona; University of Vermont (2013-06)
      In the spring semester of 2013, the University of Arizona Libraries partnered with the Eller College of Management to provide instruction to all first-semester Eller students. An online toolkit of library resources was created in Blackboard. The first day of the semester, two groups of 250 students each assembled into a lecture hall and received an overview of the Eller first-year experience, which included a 50-minute library instruction session. The challenge was how to provide an environment in which the students could have hands-on instruction while receiving personalized assistance and also to ensure that the students retained the concepts learned. The librarians utilized online quizzes to guide the in-class instruction and then required a four-part post-class tutorial, using interactive guide-on-the-side technology to strengthen retention and follow-up quizzes to test retention. This poster’s charts, screen shots, and photos will examine the process, the technology utilized, and results from the quizzes and website analytics.
    • The University of Arizona Libraries

      Kearney, Dylan; Platts, Symeon (2013)
    • Reproducibility, Open Data, Multiplication of Data Impact

      Koch, Steve; University of New Mexico (2011-10-25)
      This presentation was given at the 2011 Open Access Week program, “The Future of Data: Open Access and Reproducibility” on October 25, 2011. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Open Data is the idea that data should be freely available to anyone to use and reuse without access restrictions, licenses, copyright, patents and charges for use. For many scientists, integrating data is becoming a necessity.
    • A More Open Future for the Past

      Kansa, Eric; University of California, Berkeley (2011-10-25)
      This presentation was given at the 2011 Open Access Week program, “The Future of Data: Open Access and Reproducibility” on October 25, 2011. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Open Data is the idea that data should be freely available to anyone to use and reuse without access restrictions, licenses, copyright, patents and charges for use.
    • University Research Distribution: From Option to Necessity

      Shulenburger, David; Association of Public and Land Grant Institutions (2009-10-16)
      This presentation was given during Open Access Week in October 2009. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone.
    • Emerging Role of Social Media in Data Sharing and Management

      Ram, Sudha; University of Arizona (2012-10-23)
      This presentation was given at the 2012 Open Access Week program, “The Open Data Revolution: Challenges and Innovations” on October 23, 2012. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Many funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, and journal publishers, such as Nature, require researchers to share data produced during the course of their research. When researchers share their data, other researchers can reuse it to answer new questions, opening up new interpretations and discoveries. Sharing data may also lead to sharing research processes, workflows and tools and may make research articles and papers more useful and citable by others.
    • Open Data Challenges in Interdisciplinary Research

      Barton, Jennifer K.; University of Arizona (2012-10-23)
      This presentation was given at the 2012 Open Access Week program, “The Open Data Revolution: Challenges and Innovations” on October 23, 2012. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Many funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, and journal publishers, such as Nature, require researchers to share data produced during the course of their research. When researchers share their data, other researchers can reuse it to answer new questions, opening up new interpretations and discoveries. Sharing data may also lead to sharing research processes, workflows and tools and may make research articles and papers more useful and citable by others.
    • Innovation in Health Care Through Open Source Research

      Hurwitz, Bonnie; University of Arizona (2012-10-23)
      This presentation was given at the 2012 Open Access Week program, “The Open Data Revolution: Challenges and Innovations” on October 23, 2012. Open Access Week is a world-wide event where academic institutions explore Open Access – the ideal of free, full-text, immediate, online access to peer-reviewed scholarship and research results so new ideas and information can be obtained rapidly and freely by everyone. Many funding agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, and journal publishers, such as Nature, require researchers to share data produced during the course of their research. When researchers share their data, other researchers can reuse it to answer new questions, opening up new interpretations and discoveries. Sharing data may also lead to sharing research processes, workflows and tools and may make research articles and papers more useful and citable by others.