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dc.contributor.authorPostillion, Frank G.*
dc.contributor.authorBlock, Michael W.*
dc.contributor.authorMerz, August*
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-18T17:25:32Z
dc.date.available2013-07-18T17:25:32Z
dc.date.issued1986-04-19
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296389
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1986 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Association, Hydrology Section - Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the Arizona Hydrological Society - April 19, 1986, Glendale Community College, Glendale, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractThe Green Valley Wastewater Treatment Facility (GVWWTF) is about 20 miles south of Tucson, Arizona. Locally, the aquifer consists of interbedded sands, silts and gravels. Depth to water near the facility is about 160 feet with transmissivity ranging from 32,000 to 48,000 gpd /ft. Ground water quality has historically been poor near the facility due to deep percolation of irrigation return flow. With the retirement of farm land, however, ground water quality has improved considerably. The only problem with well water downgradient of GVWWTF has been with total coliform where several samples exceeded public drinking water standards. Current inflow of about 1.1 mgd will increase to 4.5 mgd by 2005. Flow net and mass balance analyses indicate effluent recharge by percolation beds will increase from 1060 AF /year to 4130 AF /year during this period. A mass balance model predicts TDS will increase from about 585 to 615 mg/l, nitrate-N will increase from 9.2 to 9.9 mg/l, chloride will increase from 50 to 75 mg/1, and sulfate will decrease by 25 mg/l to 115 mg/l. Further study of pond disinfection for prevention of microbiological contamination is suggested. Additionally, effluent reuse and an enhanced monitoring program including upgradient and downgradient wells are encouraged.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.titleEffects of the Green Valley Wastewater Treatment Facility Upon Groundwater Qualityen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPima Association of Governments, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T20:18:26Z
html.description.abstractThe Green Valley Wastewater Treatment Facility (GVWWTF) is about 20 miles south of Tucson, Arizona. Locally, the aquifer consists of interbedded sands, silts and gravels. Depth to water near the facility is about 160 feet with transmissivity ranging from 32,000 to 48,000 gpd /ft. Ground water quality has historically been poor near the facility due to deep percolation of irrigation return flow. With the retirement of farm land, however, ground water quality has improved considerably. The only problem with well water downgradient of GVWWTF has been with total coliform where several samples exceeded public drinking water standards. Current inflow of about 1.1 mgd will increase to 4.5 mgd by 2005. Flow net and mass balance analyses indicate effluent recharge by percolation beds will increase from 1060 AF /year to 4130 AF /year during this period. A mass balance model predicts TDS will increase from about 585 to 615 mg/l, nitrate-N will increase from 9.2 to 9.9 mg/l, chloride will increase from 50 to 75 mg/1, and sulfate will decrease by 25 mg/l to 115 mg/l. Further study of pond disinfection for prevention of microbiological contamination is suggested. Additionally, effluent reuse and an enhanced monitoring program including upgradient and downgradient wells are encouraged.


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