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dc.contributor.authorKarnieli, Arnon,1952-
dc.contributor.authorOsborn, Herbert B.
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-18T18:58:47Z
dc.date.available2013-07-18T18:58:47Z
dc.date.issued1988-04-16
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296408
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1988 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Association and the Hydrology Section - Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science - April 16, 1988, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractSeasonal and annual precipitation vary considerably in Arizona, primarily because of topographic influences. Precipitation data have been analyzed by several investigators over the years. Arizona has been subdivided into precipitation zones, and seasonal and annual precipitation isohyetal maps are available from several sources. Because of a paucity of raingages in the more mountainous regions, however, isohyetal lines in these regions have been largely estimated based on the assumptions of topographic influences. Now, with 158 raingages with 30 or more years of record, topographic factors can be combined with greater knowledge of the sources and paths of moisture into the state to better define annual and seasonal precipitation variability. Elevation and aspect appear to be the principal parameters for analyzing precipitation within the state, with the Mogollon Rim exerting the greatest influence on winter precipitation. Higher than anticipated summer rainfall in southeastern Arizona (based on elevation and aspect) suggest that sources and availability of atmospheric moisture may be a strong parameter in analyzing summer rainfall.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.titleFactors Affecting Seasonal and Annual Precipitation in Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, Arizona 85719en_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T19:07:35Z
html.description.abstractSeasonal and annual precipitation vary considerably in Arizona, primarily because of topographic influences. Precipitation data have been analyzed by several investigators over the years. Arizona has been subdivided into precipitation zones, and seasonal and annual precipitation isohyetal maps are available from several sources. Because of a paucity of raingages in the more mountainous regions, however, isohyetal lines in these regions have been largely estimated based on the assumptions of topographic influences. Now, with 158 raingages with 30 or more years of record, topographic factors can be combined with greater knowledge of the sources and paths of moisture into the state to better define annual and seasonal precipitation variability. Elevation and aspect appear to be the principal parameters for analyzing precipitation within the state, with the Mogollon Rim exerting the greatest influence on winter precipitation. Higher than anticipated summer rainfall in southeastern Arizona (based on elevation and aspect) suggest that sources and availability of atmospheric moisture may be a strong parameter in analyzing summer rainfall.


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