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dc.contributor.authorRivard, Donald T.
dc.contributor.authorKarpiscak, Martin M.
dc.contributor.authorDeCook, K. James
dc.contributor.authorFrance, Glenn W.
dc.contributor.authorOsborn, Donald E.
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-18T19:06:29Z
dc.date.available2013-07-18T19:06:29Z
dc.date.issued1988-04-16
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296421
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1988 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Association and the Hydrology Section - Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science - April 16, 1988, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractThe University of Arizona, under a contract from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), investigated water contamination problems in six Southwestern States -- Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. A variety of surface and groundwater problems were encountered, including 1) high total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations, 2) contamination by organic compounds, 3) contamination due to high concentrations of inorganic compounds, 4) biological contamination, 5) radioactive contamination, and 6) toxic and hazardous waste disposal. Literature and computer searches provided an overview of existing problems, but no central depository of information on water contamination problems was found to exist. Specific information was obtained from federal, state, and local government agencies concerned with water quality. Data were collected via telephone interviews, letters, and in- person office visits. Limitations inherent in these data collection methods included, 1) not knowing if all the correct contacts were made concerning a specific problem or site, 2) inability to ascertain whether all contacts were willing and /or able to supply complete, accurate, and updated information, 3) possible bypassing of important data sources, and 4) delays in receiving reports and materials by mail from telephone contacts. Findings indicate that many localities in the Southwest have water contamination problems in some form; more than sixty sites have been described to date.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.titleWater Contamination Sites in the Southwest: Compiling a Data Baseen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85719en_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-03T06:00:28Z
html.description.abstractThe University of Arizona, under a contract from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), investigated water contamination problems in six Southwestern States -- Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. A variety of surface and groundwater problems were encountered, including 1) high total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations, 2) contamination by organic compounds, 3) contamination due to high concentrations of inorganic compounds, 4) biological contamination, 5) radioactive contamination, and 6) toxic and hazardous waste disposal. Literature and computer searches provided an overview of existing problems, but no central depository of information on water contamination problems was found to exist. Specific information was obtained from federal, state, and local government agencies concerned with water quality. Data were collected via telephone interviews, letters, and in- person office visits. Limitations inherent in these data collection methods included, 1) not knowing if all the correct contacts were made concerning a specific problem or site, 2) inability to ascertain whether all contacts were willing and /or able to supply complete, accurate, and updated information, 3) possible bypassing of important data sources, and 4) delays in receiving reports and materials by mail from telephone contacts. Findings indicate that many localities in the Southwest have water contamination problems in some form; more than sixty sites have been described to date.


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