• Dalea - Horticulturally Promising Legumes for Desert Landscapes

      Starr, Greg; Starr Nursery (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Dalea is a member of the family Leguminosae which includes many commonly cultivated plants used in southwestern desert landscapes. With 166 described species, it is surprising to learn that until recently Dalea has largely been neglected horticulturally. In this paper I discuss seven promising species that have been tested in landscape situations for five years. These include six shrubs and one spreading groundcover. All except the groundcover are extremely showy when at the peak of flowering. Each species is unique and all are highly recommended for landscaping in arid regions of the world.
    • Dasylirion - The Shaggy Lilies

      Starr, Greg (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-06)
    • A Day in the Syunt-Khasardagh

      Feldman, William R.; Boyce Thompson Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20)
    • A Day in the Syunt-Khasardagh Zapovednik of Turkmenistan

      Feldman, William R. (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
    • A Debt to the Future: Achievement of the Desert Laboratory, Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona

      Bowers, Janice E.; US Geological Survey (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-06)
      In 1903 the Carnegie Institution of Washington established a Desert Laboratory on Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona. For the next thirty-seven years the Desert Laboratory was the site of pioneering research into the biology and ecology of desert Plants and animals. More than sixty scientists who worked on Tumamoc Hill published some 350 papers and books based on research there. William A. Cannon and Volney M. Spalding share credit for successfully launching the new facility. Daniel T. MacDougal, who became the first director in 1906, hired an enthusiastic, able staff and recruited many visiting scientists. His untiring promotional efforts gave the laboratory a national reputation, and when he transferred his research projects to a second laboratory at Carmel, California, the Desert Laboratory entered a nine year decline. Promotion of Forrest Shreve to head the laboratory in 1928 brought about a renewed focus on the ecology of desert plants. The Carnegie Institution closed the facility in 1940, ostensibly because of the depression and consequent financial cutbacks, but actually because institution administrators no longer found it worthwhile to support descriptive ecological research.
    • A Debt to the Future: Scientific Achievements of the Desert Laboratory, Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona

      Bowers, Janice E.; U.S. Geological Survey (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      In 1903 the Carnegie Institution of Washington established a Desert Laboratory on Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona. For the next thirty -seven years the Desert Laboratory was the site of pioneering research into the biology and ecology of desert plants and animals. The more than sixty scientists who worked on Tumamoc Hill published some 350 papers and books based on research there. William A. Cannon and Volney M. Spalding share credit for successfully launching the new facility. Daniel T. Mac - Dougal, who became the first director in 1906, hired an enthusiastic, able staff and recruited many visiting scientists. His untiring promotional efforts gave the laboratory a national reputation, and when he transferred his research projects to a second laboratory at Carmel, California, the Desert Laboratory entered a nine -year decline. Promotion of Forrest Shreve to head the laboratory in 1928 brought about a renewed focus on the ecology of desert plants. The Carnegie Institution closed the facility in 1940, ostensibly because of the depression and consequent financial cutbacks, but actually because institution administrators no longer found it worthwhile to support descriptive ecological research.
    • A Debt to the Past: Long-term and Current Plant Research at Tumamoc Hill in Tucson, Arizona

      Webb, Robert H.; Turner, Raymond M.; U.S. Geological Survey (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
    • Dedication of Boyce Thompson Arboretum April 1929

      Crider, Franklin J.; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-12)
    • DELEP Seeds Arrive in Svalbard

      Norem, Margaret; Desert Legume Program, Boyce Thompson Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-06)
    • DELEP Seeds Will Go to the Arctic

      Norem, Margaret; Desert Legume Program, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
    • A Demographic Study of Maguey Verde (Agave salmiana ssp. Crassispina) Under Conditions of Intense Utilization

      Martinez-Morales, Rafael; Meyer, Susan E.; Centro Regional para Estudios de Zonas Acidas y Semiaridas del Colegio de Postgraduasos Salinas de Hidalgo, San Luis Potosí, México (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
      In western San Luis Potosi, Mexico, wild populations of Maguey Verde (Agave Salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck ssp. crassispina (Trel.) Gentry) are intensively utilized, especially as raw material for production of the distilled liquor mezcal. A demographic approach was used to investigate possible explanations for recent population decline. The effect of overgrazing on the survival of young plants (offsets) was found to be a major problem. Harvest of sexually mature plants for mezcal aggravates the problem by leaving both soil and offsets exposed. But, in itself, this harvest seems to constitute a reasonable long-term use for wild populations, even though seed production is halted.
    • THE DESERT EDGE: FLORA OF THE GUAYMAS REGION OF SONORA, MEXICO. PART 1: THE CHECKLIST

      Felger, Richard Stephen; Carnahan, Susan Davis; Sanchez-Escalante, Jose Jesus; Univ Arizona, Herbarium (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-10)
      A checklist is provided for the vascular plants of the Guaymas region of western Sonora. This region encompasses 532,000 hectares (1,314,600 acres) where the southern Sonoran Desert transitions from subtropical thornscrub. This flora includes 820 native and non-native taxa in 113 families and 471 genera. There are 97 non-natives established in the flora area, 27 of which are grasses. Nineteen taxa are endemic to the flora area.
    • Desert Landscaping in South-Central Arizona

      Yang, Tien Wei, 1921- (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
    • The Desert Legume Program - A Brief History

      Johnson, Matthew B.; Desert Legume Program (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
    • The Desert Marigold Moth

      Myles, Timothy G.; Binder, Bradley F.; University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      The moth Schinia miniana (Grote) of Lepidoptera family Noctuidae is reported on Desert Marigold (Baileya multiradiata) of plant family Compositae. Characteristics of the plant and the life history of the insect are discussed. Principal features of this plant-insect interaction are described and illustrated.
    • Desert Plant Food

      Groen, Jean; Wells, Don; Wells/Groen Publishing Company (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-06)
    • Desert Plants - Table of Contents

      Norem, Margaret A. (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20)
    • Desert Plants and their Exudates

      Santiago-Blay, Jorge A.; Lambert, Joseph B.; Department of Paleobiology, MRC-121, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-06)