• Identification and Taxonomy of Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) in New Mexico

      Allred, Kelly W.; Range Science Herbarium, Department of Animal & Range Sciences, New Mexico State University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-12)
      The identity and distribution of Tamarix in New Mexico is reviewed, with keys and distribution maps. Four species are found in the state: T. aphylla, T. chinensis (including T. ramosissima), T. gallica, and T. parviflora.
    • Idria columnaris: Age as Determined by Growth Rate

      Humphrey, Robert R.; Humphrey, Alan B.; University of Arizona; University of Rhode Island (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
    • Images from the Outback

      Johnson, Matthew B.; Desert Legume Program, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-12)
    • Impact of Herbicides on Cacti

      Crosswhite, Franks S.; Feldman, William R.; Minch, Edwin W.; University of Arizona, Boyce Thompson Southwest Arboretum; Arizona Department of Agriculture (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-12)
      The effects of nine herbicides were evaluated on five species of cacti selected to be congeneric with species classified as rare, threatened or endangered. Experimental plants were monitored at monthly intervals for survival and vigor for either six or sixteen months after herbicide treatment, depending on the overall condition of the untreated controls of each species. The severity of herbicide impact varied among active ingredients from lethality to virtually no effect. Some herbicides resulted in slow decline of treated plants, while for other herbicides most damage occurred within a short time after treatment. Some treated plants were observed to recover from herbicide damage, especially with paraquat. A wide variety of factors, both environmental as well as anatomical and physiological characteristics of the test plants are important in determining how a given plant will respond to herbicide exposure.
    • The Incredible Elephant-Foot Cissus

      University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982-01
    • Indigenous Use of Mopane (Colophospermum mopane) in Northwestern Namibia

      Bainbridge, Holly; Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-12)
      The ability of people to adapt to limited resources is particularly remarkable in areas dominated by only one plant species. In the case of one indigenous people of northwestern Namibia, the Himba, often the only readily available plant material is that of the mopane ( Colophospermum mopane) due to harsh soil and weather conditions. By interviewing various Himba in seven different compounds located around Epupa Falls, Namibia, I was able to grasp the wide usage and cultural importance of mopane. They use nearly every part of this tree for various purposes spanning from construction to pain relief clearly showing the Himba's ability to maximize its potential. From personal interaction, it was clear that not only is the mopane ingrained into their daily lifestyle, but also into the Himba culture, as the basis of religious communication with the afterlife. Additionally, based on observation of the area, the cultural importance of mopane for the Himba may unintentionally protect it, given the close relationship between the people and the tree. Based on its myriad of uses, mopane plays an important role in the preservation of a traditional culture that is at the brink of modernization.
    • Interior and Californian Riparian Deciduous Forests and Woodlands

      Minckley, W. L.; Brown, David E.; Department of Zoology, Arizona State University; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Interior Chaparral

      Pase, Charles P.; Brown, David E.; USDA Forest Service; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Interior Strands

      Minckley, W. L.; Brown, David E.; Department of Zoology, Arizona State University; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Intriguing Chihuahuan Desert Yuccas in Cultivation

      Starr, Greg (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20)
    • Introduction

      Lowe, Charles H.; Brown, David E.; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Introduction to the Symposium

      Gentry, Howard Scott; Desert Botanical Garden (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
    • Is Your Landscape Threatening the Desert?

      Tellman, Barbara (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-12)
    • 'J. G. Lemmon & Wife,' Plant Explorers in Arizona, California, and Nevada

      Crosswhite, Frank S.; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1979-08)
    • Jatropha (Euphorbiaceae) in Southwestern United States and Adjacent Northern Mexico

      Johnson, Matthew B.; Desert Legume Program, The University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-12)
    • John C. Fremont: Explorer, Plant Collector and Politician

      Crosswhite, Frank S.; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984)
    • Karoo Desert National Botanical Garden

      Oliver, Ian; Karoo Botanical Garden (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
    • Land Fraud and Nutgalls

      University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1981
    • Landscape Plants Persistence at Williams AFB

      Carter, Steven J.; Feldman, William R.; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20)
    • Landscape Water Use in Phoenix, Arizona

      Martin, Chris A.; Urban Horticulture Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Plant Biology, Arizona State University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20)