• A Scottsdale Xeriscape Project

      Mielke, Judy (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-06)
    • Seed Coat Treatments Influence Germination of Taxodium mucronatum

      St. Hilaire, Rolston; Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, New Mexico State University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20)
      The range of Taxodium mucronatum Ten. (Mexican bald cypress) is declining rapidly, yet relatively little is known about the propagation of this valuable ornamental tree. The objective of this study was to determine whether seed coat treatments could enhance the germination of Mexican bald cypress. Seeds of Mexican bald cypress were collected from Las Cruces and the Gila National Forest, New Mexico. In one experiment, seed coats were knicked or left intact, then germinated on moist filter paper or flooded with water. In another experiment, seed coats from the Las Cruces provenance were treated with sulfuric acid, knicked, left intact, or removed (excised embryos) and germinated on moist filter paper. Knicked and moist seeds had a greater mean cumulative germination percentage (13.5 %) than intact and flooded seeds (4.2 %). Final germination percentage of the Las Cruces source was similar among knicked seeds, intact seeds, and excised embryos, but intact seeds took a longer time (15 days) to reach 50% of final germination percentage than did excised embryos (10 days) and knicked seeds (8 days). Seeds treated with sulfuric did not germinate. Results indicate seed coat pretreatments are needed to release physical dormancy and promote efficient germination of Mexican bald cypress.
    • Selenium and Casilleja

      University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1983
    • Semidesert Grassland

      Brown, David E.; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Sesbania-Rhizobium Specificity and Nitrogen Fixation

      Abdel Magid, H. M.; Singleton, P. W.; Tavares, J. W.; King Saud University; University of Hawaii (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      The compatibility of potentially nitrogen fixing associations between ten Rhizobium strains and six Sesbania accessions (species) was studied under glasshouse conditions. The rates of N₂ (C₂ H₂) fixation (u moles C₂ H₄ /plant/h) were determined. The various Sesbania accessions responded differently to inoculation with the strains tested. The ANOVA test revealed that there are real accessions (P = 0.01) and strains (P = 0.05) differences. In general the results obtained indicated that the highest mean rate of N₂ (C₂ H₂) fixation and the highest degree of compatibility with strains under test was shown by Sesbania bispinosa (accession BA12). Sesbania grandiflora (accession GL 2.02) ranked next. The performance of Sesbania pachycarpa (accession PCI), Sesbania macrantha (accession MNI), and Sesbania sesban (accession SBIO) in the N₂ (C₂ H₂) assay is lower than that of accessions BAI2 and GL2.02, thus indicating the possibility of lack of compatibility between these three accessions and almost all of the Rhizobium strains studied. Plants of Sesbania rostrata (accession RSI) produced either extremely low or no ethylene (C₂ H₄) quantities in the N₂ (C₂ H₂) assay thus indicative of high specificity or that this legume is not promiscuous at all. However, inoculated and fertilized Sesbania rostrata performed quite satisfactorily and formed profuse N₂-fixing nodules on roots and stems when grown in potted soil under Central Saudi Arabia climatic conditions. The results obtained indicated high variability among treatments in nodule number.
    • Sierran Montane Conifer Forest

      Pase, Charles P.; USDA Forest Service (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Sierran Subalpine Conifer Forest

      Pase, Charles P.; USDA Forest Service (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • The Significance of Cacti in the Diet of the Javelina (Tayassu tajacu)

      Crosswhite, Carol D.; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984)
    • Sinaloan Deciduous Forest

      Gentry, Howard Scott; Desert Botanical Garden of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Sinaloan Maritime Scrubland

      Minckley, W. L.; Brown, David E.; Department of Zoology, Arizona State University; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Sinaloan Riparian Evergreen Forest and Woodland

      Minckley, W. L.; Brown, David E.; Department of Zoology, Arizona State University; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Sinaloan Thornscrub

      Brown, David E.; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Singing the Praises of Gardening in the Shade

      Lee, Maggie; Terra Flora Designs (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-06)
    • Soil Mixes for Greenhouse and Nursery Growth of Desert Plants

      Augustine, Greg; Augustine, John; Back, Dan; Backhaus, Ralph; Corgan, Joe; Dimmitt, Mark; Fraser, George; Gass, Ron; Gass, Victor; Grigsby, Dave; et al. (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1979-11)
    • Some Thoughts from the Director: The Fascinating Family of Polygonaceae

      Siegwarth, Mark; Boyce Thompson Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-12)
    • Sonoran and Sinaloan Interior Marshlands and Submergent Communities

      Minckley, W. L.; Brown, David E.; Department of Zoology, Arizona State University; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)
    • Sonoran Desert Rhizobia Found to Nodulate Acacia constricta

      Waldon, Hollis B.; Waldon Laboratories (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987)
    • Sonoran Desertscrub

      Turner, Raymond M.; Brown, David E.; Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior; Arizona Game and Fish Department (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982)