• A Naturally Occurring Orange-Topped Cardon (Pachycereus pringlei) Discovered in Baja California del Sur

      Perrill, Robert H.; Arizona-Sonoran Desert Museum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
    • Neotropical Savanna Grasslands

      Brown, David E.; Makings, Elizabeth; Arizona State University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-01)
    • New Books

      University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05-20
    • New Ground Cover Releases

      Jones, Warren D.; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1980)
    • New Information on the Origins of Bottle Gourd (Lagenaria siceraria)

      Ellert, Mary Wilkins (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-06)
    • New Life from Ashes II: A Tale of Burnt Brush

      Bohrer, Vorsila L.; Southwest Ethnobotanical Enterprises (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992)
    • New Life from Ashes: The Tale of the Burnt Rush (Rhus trilobata)

      Bohrer, Vorsila L.; Eastern New Mexico University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1983)
    • A New Locality for Desert Fan Palms in California

      Cornett, James W.; Palm Springs Desert Museum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
    • New Plant Records from the Sonoran Desert

      Yatskievych, George; Fischer, Pierre C.; Department of Biology, Indiana University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984)
      The vegetation and flora of the Sonoran Desert are among the most thoroughly documented of the arid portions of North America. The climate and relative accessibility of the area have attracted many botanists and the landmark studies resulting from their efforts, too numerous to list here (see Shreve and Wiggins 1964, and Kearney and Peebles 1960 for partial bibliographies) are a testament to their achievements. In an area covering over 310,000 square km (Shreve 1951) it is not, however, surprising that some less-known localities should exist, which might harbor plant species not previously known to exist there. For example, H.S. Gentry (1972) described two very distinctive Sonoran Desert species of Agave (A. zebra and A. pelona) from localities in the mountains near the Gulf of California. The plant records reported here were encountered during visits to observe these endemic century plants in a small range of mountains, the Sierra del Viejo.
    • New Salt Tolerant Crops for the Sonoran Desert

      Yensen, Nicholas P.; Fontes, Migues R.; Glenn, Edward P.; Felger, Richard S.; Environmental Research Laboratory, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1982-01)
    • New World Salvias For Cultivation in Southern Arizona

      Starr, Greg (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
      A compilation of information on New World Salvias which are adaptable for cultivation in southern Arizona is presented. Southern Arizona is restricted to mid- and low-elevation desert regions. Description, taxonomy, and horticulture of the genus are discussed. A key to species is provided for identification. Detailed descriptions, locale of native occurrence, and cultivation of twenty -seven taxa are included.
    • Nitrogen Fixation in Desert Legumes

      Crosswhite, F. S.; Crosswhite, C. D. (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
    • Note from the Director

      Siegwarth, Mark; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-12)
    • Note from the Director

      Siegwarth, Mark; Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-06)
    • Notes on Arizona Grasses

      Reeder, John R.; Reeder, Charlotte G.; Herbarium, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1985)
    • Notes on the Flora of Arizona VI

      Mason, Charles T., Jr.; Yatskievych, George; Herbarium, University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1981)
    • Notes on the Flora of Arizona VII

      Mason, Charles T., Jr.; Van Devender, Rebecca K.; Starr, Gregory D.; University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986)
    • Noteworthy Collections from Tempe Town Lake Riverbed

      Makings, Elizabeth; Butler, Lane; Chew, Matthew; Stromberg, Juliet; School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-06)
    • Nutritional Composition of Desert Bighorn Sheep Forage in the Harquahala Mountains, Arizona

      Seegmiller, Rick F.; Krausman, Paul R.; Brown, William H.; Whiting, Frank M.; University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Samples of 32 plant species (24 woody and succulent species, 5 grasses, 3 forbs) used by Desert Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) in the Harquahala Mountains, Arizona were collected bimonthly in 1982. All samples were analyzed for dry matter, protein, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber, lignin, cellulose, cell solubles, hemicellulose, ether extract, and ash. Woody and succulent plants had the highest protein levels (x̄ = 9.3% in September and October to 11.1% in January and February) followed by forbs and grass, respectively. Nutritional data are presented in tabular form as a reference source for wildlife biologists, range managers and scientists in related fields charged with managing Arizona's rangelands.
    • Nutritional Composition of Desert Mule Deer Forage in the Picacho Mountains, Arizona

      Krausman, Paul R.; Ordway, Leonard L.; Whiting, Frank M.; Brown, William H.; University of Arizona (University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Nineteen forage species used by Desert Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) in the Picacho Mountains, Arizona were collected bimonthly in 1983 and analyzed for dry matter, protein fiber, lignin, ether extract, ash, cellulose, cell solubles, and hemicellulose. Results of the analyses are presented as a reference source for wildlife biologists, range managers, and others working with desert ecosystems.