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dc.contributor.advisorFishback, Price
dc.contributor.authorGuay, Lisa Marie*
dc.creatorGuay, Lisa Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-07T20:13:46Z
dc.date.available2013-08-07T20:13:46Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297506
dc.description.abstractIndividual states varied in their responses to the Great Depression and federal New Deal programs, and these reactions affected the success of relief efforts. A combined historical and data-based econometric approach is employed to characterize the impact of state policies on outcomes. At first, Ohio relied on charity and local governments rather than state public assistance. The state legislature was divided between rural and urban interests and few taxation mechanisms existed. Eventually, use and sales taxes were imposed, though income taxes did not prove feasible. Political squabbles and the resurgence of the Republican party somewhat derailed state relief efforts, leaving many areas dependent on New Deal programs until the national recovery took hold. State-reported data and federal statistics were used to generate four initial econometric models of per capita state revenue. The effects of real per capita state income, real per capita federal tax revenue, per capita auto registrations, and percent of democratic representatives in the state legislature’s lower house were statistically significant in at least one model, while those for the mean democratic vote percent in presidential elections from 1896 up to the most recent election and real per capita federal grants to states were not.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleMore than the New Deal: Ohio State Finance During the Great Depressionen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T09:36:29Z
html.description.abstractIndividual states varied in their responses to the Great Depression and federal New Deal programs, and these reactions affected the success of relief efforts. A combined historical and data-based econometric approach is employed to characterize the impact of state policies on outcomes. At first, Ohio relied on charity and local governments rather than state public assistance. The state legislature was divided between rural and urban interests and few taxation mechanisms existed. Eventually, use and sales taxes were imposed, though income taxes did not prove feasible. Political squabbles and the resurgence of the Republican party somewhat derailed state relief efforts, leaving many areas dependent on New Deal programs until the national recovery took hold. State-reported data and federal statistics were used to generate four initial econometric models of per capita state revenue. The effects of real per capita state income, real per capita federal tax revenue, per capita auto registrations, and percent of democratic representatives in the state legislature’s lower house were statistically significant in at least one model, while those for the mean democratic vote percent in presidential elections from 1896 up to the most recent election and real per capita federal grants to states were not.


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