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dc.contributor.advisorBecker, Judith
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Shelby Rae
dc.creatorCurtis, Shelby Raeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-07T22:05:33Z
dc.date.available2013-08-07T22:05:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297533
dc.description.abstractThe majority of recent research into psychopathy and rule breaking has focused almost entirely on self report measures of academic cheating. There has been little research into experimental tasks to observe rule breaking. To fill this methodological deficit, we conducted a study where we utilized an in-person task to measure general rule breaking behaviors while replicating the self report measures of criminal history and academic cheating. After completing a host of personality measures that included the Dark Triad (Machiavellianism, narcissism, psychopathy), subjects completed a series of mazes at varying of levels of difficulty and were explicitly told not to break a series of established rules. Only secondary psychopathy was significantly correlated to rule breaking on the maze task, though primary psychopathy was significantly correlated to criminal history. After multiple regression, a subsection of secondary psychopathy, Machiavellian egocentricity, significantly predicted rule breaking by use of the path verify option on the maze task. Additional research and future directions are discussed.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleBreaking the Rules: A Study on Psychopathyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T21:37:04Z
html.description.abstractThe majority of recent research into psychopathy and rule breaking has focused almost entirely on self report measures of academic cheating. There has been little research into experimental tasks to observe rule breaking. To fill this methodological deficit, we conducted a study where we utilized an in-person task to measure general rule breaking behaviors while replicating the self report measures of criminal history and academic cheating. After completing a host of personality measures that included the Dark Triad (Machiavellianism, narcissism, psychopathy), subjects completed a series of mazes at varying of levels of difficulty and were explicitly told not to break a series of established rules. Only secondary psychopathy was significantly correlated to rule breaking on the maze task, though primary psychopathy was significantly correlated to criminal history. After multiple regression, a subsection of secondary psychopathy, Machiavellian egocentricity, significantly predicted rule breaking by use of the path verify option on the maze task. Additional research and future directions are discussed.


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