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dc.contributor.advisorTeske, Jennifer A.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Julia Melloen_US
dc.creatorDavis, Julia Melloen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-07T22:07:08Z
dc.date.available2013-08-07T22:07:08Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297535
dc.description.abstractChildren across the world are more obese than ever before in history. Children are beginning to manifest weight-associated diseases previously only seen in adulthood. With obese children likely remaining so into adulthood, the implications of childhood obesity are significant and long lasting. This underscores the importance of understanding its development so that it may be reversed. One aspect that has paralleled the rise in obesity is a decline in sleep duration. Epidemiologic studies suggest short sleep might play a role in weight gain and the subsequent the development of obesity among children and adolescents. Sleep deprivation is associated with hormonal alterations that favor appetite stimulation and dysregulation of glucose metabolism. Additionally, decreased physical activity is associated with chronic short sleepers. Through these mechanisms, chronic short sleep may be one aspect of the obesity epidemic that can be targeted. This paper will address the body of evidence regarding the relationship between short sleep and obesity in children and adolescents.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleAn Overview of Sleep and Obesity in Children and Adolescentsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T11:07:03Z
html.description.abstractChildren across the world are more obese than ever before in history. Children are beginning to manifest weight-associated diseases previously only seen in adulthood. With obese children likely remaining so into adulthood, the implications of childhood obesity are significant and long lasting. This underscores the importance of understanding its development so that it may be reversed. One aspect that has paralleled the rise in obesity is a decline in sleep duration. Epidemiologic studies suggest short sleep might play a role in weight gain and the subsequent the development of obesity among children and adolescents. Sleep deprivation is associated with hormonal alterations that favor appetite stimulation and dysregulation of glucose metabolism. Additionally, decreased physical activity is associated with chronic short sleepers. Through these mechanisms, chronic short sleep may be one aspect of the obesity epidemic that can be targeted. This paper will address the body of evidence regarding the relationship between short sleep and obesity in children and adolescents.


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