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dc.contributor.advisorDarling, Linda T.
dc.contributor.authorClark, Kyle Christopher
dc.creatorClark, Kyle Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-07T21:18:24Z
dc.date.available2013-08-07T21:18:24Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297542
dc.description.abstractThis thesis studies the diplomatic tactics that the Ottoman Empire utilized from 1821 to 1840 and argues that during this period Ottoman officials increased their diplomatic discourse with the European Powers in order to gain entrance into the Concert of Europe. Ottoman diplomatic tactics during this timeframe are then divided into two periods: March 1821 to December 1833 and December 1833 to July 1840. This thesis argues that in the former period the Ottoman Empire’s primary diplomatic tactic was to incite British Russophobia by evincing Russia’s desire for war with the Ottoman Empire. Ottoman officials hoped that British officials would thus be compelled to pressure Russia into preserving peace with the Ottoman Empire in order to maintain peace and the balance of power in Europe. Finally, this thesis argues that in the latter period, due to the earlier failures of Ottoman diplomacy as well as advice received from Great Britain, the Ottoman Empire incorporated promises to reform its government and military into its diplomatic discourse. These promised reforms were designed to convince the European Powers that the Ottoman Empire could be revitalized, and therefore deserved Europe’s official recognition of the Ottoman Empire’s administrative and territorial autonomy.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleThe Evolution of Ottoman Diplomatic Tactics from 1821 to 1840en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T17:55:55Z
html.description.abstractThis thesis studies the diplomatic tactics that the Ottoman Empire utilized from 1821 to 1840 and argues that during this period Ottoman officials increased their diplomatic discourse with the European Powers in order to gain entrance into the Concert of Europe. Ottoman diplomatic tactics during this timeframe are then divided into two periods: March 1821 to December 1833 and December 1833 to July 1840. This thesis argues that in the former period the Ottoman Empire’s primary diplomatic tactic was to incite British Russophobia by evincing Russia’s desire for war with the Ottoman Empire. Ottoman officials hoped that British officials would thus be compelled to pressure Russia into preserving peace with the Ottoman Empire in order to maintain peace and the balance of power in Europe. Finally, this thesis argues that in the latter period, due to the earlier failures of Ottoman diplomacy as well as advice received from Great Britain, the Ottoman Empire incorporated promises to reform its government and military into its diplomatic discourse. These promised reforms were designed to convince the European Powers that the Ottoman Empire could be revitalized, and therefore deserved Europe’s official recognition of the Ottoman Empire’s administrative and territorial autonomy.


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