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dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chad
dc.contributor.authorDyckman, Rachel Marie
dc.creatorDyckman, Rachel Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-07T22:11:38Z
dc.date.available2013-08-07T22:11:38Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297553
dc.description.abstractWhen a man or a woman swears that they will take their partner in sickness and in health, for better or for worse, and till death do they part, does it really matter who is looking back at them? Common law delineates that marriage is between one man and one woman; and until the last decade, this was the prevailing definition of marriage. Yet as the gay rights movement gained support, the conventional definition of marriage has transformed. But the gay rights movement is not just about securing the right to marry; it is an attempt to produce social change through the United States court system. As the gay rights movement attempts to create social change through the two gay marriage cases, will the justices declare a historic ruling on gay marriage? Yet, regardless of their decision in June 2013, the Supreme Court's decision will not affect the momentum of the gay rights movement. Through analyzing the history of the gay rights movement, the legal arguments at stake, and reviewing past influential state and Supreme Court cases, it is evident that the prevailing gay rights movement will achieve its goals regardless of winning or losing litigation at the Supreme Court.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleAmerica's Prolonged Battle for Gay Rights: Who Will Create Social Change?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-11T16:33:22Z
html.description.abstractWhen a man or a woman swears that they will take their partner in sickness and in health, for better or for worse, and till death do they part, does it really matter who is looking back at them? Common law delineates that marriage is between one man and one woman; and until the last decade, this was the prevailing definition of marriage. Yet as the gay rights movement gained support, the conventional definition of marriage has transformed. But the gay rights movement is not just about securing the right to marry; it is an attempt to produce social change through the United States court system. As the gay rights movement attempts to create social change through the two gay marriage cases, will the justices declare a historic ruling on gay marriage? Yet, regardless of their decision in June 2013, the Supreme Court's decision will not affect the momentum of the gay rights movement. Through analyzing the history of the gay rights movement, the legal arguments at stake, and reviewing past influential state and Supreme Court cases, it is evident that the prevailing gay rights movement will achieve its goals regardless of winning or losing litigation at the Supreme Court.


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