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dc.contributor.advisorRankin, Lucinda
dc.contributor.authorFeller, Fionna
dc.creatorFeller, Fionnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-07T22:41:05Z
dc.date.available2013-08-07T22:41:05Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationFeller, Fionna. (2013). The Impact of Education on the Public Perception of Vaccines: EBV as Case Study (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297562
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this study was to assess the impact of education on the perception and receptivity of vaccines in a college population. Since novel vaccines are continually being introduced to the society, it is important to determine whether these immunizations will be readily accepted and successfully distributed to all individuals. Using the potential development of a vaccine for Epstein- Barr Virus (EBV) as a test case, a pre- and post-unit anonymous survey was given to 67 University of Arizona students during an educational unit on immunology and vaccines which I led. Data from the survey showed that education indeed impacted the students’ perceptions and receptivity to vaccines. While general coverage of the immunity, vaccines and EBV resulted in 59% willingness to receive the new EBV vaccine, further specific information about low US incidence of long-term health risks and lack of efficacy in asymptomatic patients resulted in a drop in willingness to 24%. Factors cited as influencing their decision included cost, availability and sufficient information. This data reinforces the importance of understanding how vaccines are perceived in society and how provision of information is critical in shaping a person’s point of view toward immunizations and impacting community health.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleThe Impact of Education on the Public Perception of Vaccines: EBV as Case Studyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-29T01:30:40Z
html.description.abstractThe goal of this study was to assess the impact of education on the perception and receptivity of vaccines in a college population. Since novel vaccines are continually being introduced to the society, it is important to determine whether these immunizations will be readily accepted and successfully distributed to all individuals. Using the potential development of a vaccine for Epstein- Barr Virus (EBV) as a test case, a pre- and post-unit anonymous survey was given to 67 University of Arizona students during an educational unit on immunology and vaccines which I led. Data from the survey showed that education indeed impacted the students’ perceptions and receptivity to vaccines. While general coverage of the immunity, vaccines and EBV resulted in 59% willingness to receive the new EBV vaccine, further specific information about low US incidence of long-term health risks and lack of efficacy in asymptomatic patients resulted in a drop in willingness to 24%. Factors cited as influencing their decision included cost, availability and sufficient information. This data reinforces the importance of understanding how vaccines are perceived in society and how provision of information is critical in shaping a person’s point of view toward immunizations and impacting community health.


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