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dc.contributor.advisorGonzalez de Bustamante, Celeste
dc.contributor.authorGoth, Brenna Rae
dc.creatorGoth, Brenna Raeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-08T16:08:13Z
dc.date.available2013-08-08T16:08:13Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297593
dc.description.abstractThe Sanctuary Movement started in Tucson in the 1980s after a group of Tucsonans saw a situation they could not ignore. People from Central America were illegally entering the United States after fleeing violence in their countries only to die in the Sonoran Desert or be arrested by immigration officials. U.S. refugee policy was failing them, movement organizers said. The country’s hand in backing military dictatorships in Guatemala and El Salvador made it nearly impossible for people to receive asylum. The faith and activist communities united to bond people out of jail and provide them with social services while starting an underground railroad to cross refugees into the United States and transport them across the country. Policies changed by the end of the movement, after 12 participants were charged in a federal trial and sites throughout the nation declared themselves as sanctuaries. The movement strengthened a culture of border activism in Tucson and led to the formation of several humanitarian organizations operating today. This journalism professional project traces the history of the movement and follows its founders through their current work on the U.S.‐Mexico border.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleTucson's Sanctuary Movement: A Living History of Its Founders and Their Work on the U.S.-Mexico Border Todayen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalismen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T08:28:31Z
html.description.abstractThe Sanctuary Movement started in Tucson in the 1980s after a group of Tucsonans saw a situation they could not ignore. People from Central America were illegally entering the United States after fleeing violence in their countries only to die in the Sonoran Desert or be arrested by immigration officials. U.S. refugee policy was failing them, movement organizers said. The country’s hand in backing military dictatorships in Guatemala and El Salvador made it nearly impossible for people to receive asylum. The faith and activist communities united to bond people out of jail and provide them with social services while starting an underground railroad to cross refugees into the United States and transport them across the country. Policies changed by the end of the movement, after 12 participants were charged in a federal trial and sites throughout the nation declared themselves as sanctuaries. The movement strengthened a culture of border activism in Tucson and led to the formation of several humanitarian organizations operating today. This journalism professional project traces the history of the movement and follows its founders through their current work on the U.S.‐Mexico border.


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