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dc.contributor.advisorHingle, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Megan Lynn
dc.creatorMeyer, Megan Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T16:50:16Z
dc.date.available2013-08-09T16:50:16Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297699
dc.description.abstractObjective. Diet quality is poor in the United States and is an area of concern for the health of the population. Gardening interventions are promising ways to improve diet quality. The most effective gardening method to improve diet quality remains unclear. A systematic review of gardening and nutrition knowledge interventions was conducted to determine interventions that improve diet quality and the most effective intervention. Method. Studies published between 2007 and 2012 were identified through a library database search. Studies involved youth in the United States and the impact of gardening intervention on diet quality. Fruit and vegetable intake, willingness to taste and preference for fruits and vegetables, and other nutrition related outcomes were examined. This review only includes peer-reviewed articles in English. Results. Six studies were reviewed. Four took place on school grounds where the nutrition education and gardening took place within school curriculum and two studies were conducted during youth summer camps. Studies include youth from 8 to 15 years. Conclusion. Findings from this review suggest that garden-based nutrition intervention programs may have the potential to improve diet quality. However, there is still need for well-designed, evidence-based, peer-reviewed studies to determine program effectiveness and impact. Limitations of the studies as well as suggestions for future research directions are provided.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleAssessing How Participation in Gardening Affects Diet Quality: A Reviewen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-20T07:19:30Z
html.description.abstractObjective. Diet quality is poor in the United States and is an area of concern for the health of the population. Gardening interventions are promising ways to improve diet quality. The most effective gardening method to improve diet quality remains unclear. A systematic review of gardening and nutrition knowledge interventions was conducted to determine interventions that improve diet quality and the most effective intervention. Method. Studies published between 2007 and 2012 were identified through a library database search. Studies involved youth in the United States and the impact of gardening intervention on diet quality. Fruit and vegetable intake, willingness to taste and preference for fruits and vegetables, and other nutrition related outcomes were examined. This review only includes peer-reviewed articles in English. Results. Six studies were reviewed. Four took place on school grounds where the nutrition education and gardening took place within school curriculum and two studies were conducted during youth summer camps. Studies include youth from 8 to 15 years. Conclusion. Findings from this review suggest that garden-based nutrition intervention programs may have the potential to improve diet quality. However, there is still need for well-designed, evidence-based, peer-reviewed studies to determine program effectiveness and impact. Limitations of the studies as well as suggestions for future research directions are provided.


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