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dc.contributor.advisorBaliani, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorLovett, Amber Carol
dc.creatorLovett, Amber Carolen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T16:35:42Z
dc.date.available2013-08-09T16:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297704
dc.description.abstractMyths are cultural repositories that reveal a society’s most intimate values, as well as its flaws. The rape of Lucretia is the myth of the founding of the Roman Republic, which is inspired by the rape of the Roman wife Lucretia by the Etruscan Prince Sextus Tarquinius, and her subsequent suicide. This myth has been revisited and reinterpreted many times since its creation, partly because it continues to present a paradox that defies interpretation: "If [Lucretia] is adulterous, why praise her? If chaste, why slay her?" (St. Augustine 29). The various reinterpretations of the myth made changes, whether subtle or dramatic, that sought to translate the story, rendering it understandable to a Christian audience. Each reinterpretation of the myth has also tried to either reconcile or emphasize this paradox, reflecting both the author’s interpretation and the contemporaneous cultural values, but most importantly hinting at the problematic response to personal suffering by individuals and societies.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titlePainful Paradoxes: Unresolved Cultural Tensions and the Response to Human Suffering in The Rape of Lucretiaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T05:38:39Z
html.description.abstractMyths are cultural repositories that reveal a society’s most intimate values, as well as its flaws. The rape of Lucretia is the myth of the founding of the Roman Republic, which is inspired by the rape of the Roman wife Lucretia by the Etruscan Prince Sextus Tarquinius, and her subsequent suicide. This myth has been revisited and reinterpreted many times since its creation, partly because it continues to present a paradox that defies interpretation: "If [Lucretia] is adulterous, why praise her? If chaste, why slay her?" (St. Augustine 29). The various reinterpretations of the myth made changes, whether subtle or dramatic, that sought to translate the story, rendering it understandable to a Christian audience. Each reinterpretation of the myth has also tried to either reconcile or emphasize this paradox, reflecting both the author’s interpretation and the contemporaneous cultural values, but most importantly hinting at the problematic response to personal suffering by individuals and societies.


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