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dc.contributor.advisorSchau, Hope Jensen
dc.contributor.authorRegele, Amanda Colleen
dc.creatorRegele, Amanda Colleenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T18:47:34Z
dc.date.available2013-08-09T18:47:34Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297732
dc.description.abstractTwo significant trends are overcoming today’s society: the growth in obesity rates and health concerns as well as the rise of the technology era and use of social media. The purpose of this study is to analyze the overlap between these two powerful forces and determine whether modern media applications that are geared toward health and fitness play a significant role in helping that user achieve their goals and thus help address the United States’ obesity problem. Findings from this study show that people who use fitness applications are likely to run more frequently within a given week, signifying higher adherence to exercise. Additionally, across all categories, those who track workouts showed greater improvement and higher motivation than those who do not. On top of this, those who track and also collaborate with others within the application showed greater improvement than those who tracked without collaborating. While past research indicates that only intrinsic motives lead to long-term compliance, fitness applications, amidst being focused on mainly extrinsic factors, achieve a similar result by fostering enjoyment within the user by offering social interaction, competition, expertise, and satisfaction from continual tracking. This study shows how social media can be used to foster long-term fitness compliance, which is ultimately the only way to truly combat the mounting obesity problem within our nation. In essence, technology doesn’t have to make you lazier- it can do the opposite.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleEffects of Online Media Applications on Fitness Complianceen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMarketingen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-05T20:39:56Z
html.description.abstractTwo significant trends are overcoming today’s society: the growth in obesity rates and health concerns as well as the rise of the technology era and use of social media. The purpose of this study is to analyze the overlap between these two powerful forces and determine whether modern media applications that are geared toward health and fitness play a significant role in helping that user achieve their goals and thus help address the United States’ obesity problem. Findings from this study show that people who use fitness applications are likely to run more frequently within a given week, signifying higher adherence to exercise. Additionally, across all categories, those who track workouts showed greater improvement and higher motivation than those who do not. On top of this, those who track and also collaborate with others within the application showed greater improvement than those who tracked without collaborating. While past research indicates that only intrinsic motives lead to long-term compliance, fitness applications, amidst being focused on mainly extrinsic factors, achieve a similar result by fostering enjoyment within the user by offering social interaction, competition, expertise, and satisfaction from continual tracking. This study shows how social media can be used to foster long-term fitness compliance, which is ultimately the only way to truly combat the mounting obesity problem within our nation. In essence, technology doesn’t have to make you lazier- it can do the opposite.


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