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dc.contributor.advisorGoing, Scott
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Lauren Ruth
dc.creatorTucker, Lauren Ruthen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T19:41:08Z
dc.date.available2013-08-09T19:41:08Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297775
dc.description.abstractContext: Numerous techniques have been proposed for enhanced recovery and decreased perception of pain after exercise. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may be a viable method to ameliorate post workout delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). However, the evidence to support WBV as a successful therapy is lacking. Objective: To study the effect of WBV on pain perception and amelioration of DOMS after an intense lower body workout regimen. Participants: 24 healthy, untrained volunteers aged 18 to 26, randomized to WBV group and control group. Intervention: Participants performed a workout regimen of six lower body exercises every other day for three weeks. WBV group was exposed to 5 minutes of vibration after each workout. Visual analog scale (VAS) and numeric rating scale (NRS) used to measure changes in perceived pain. Timed descent of a flight of stairs used to measure the effect of pain on performance. Perceived pain and timed descent were recorded on all workout days. Results: Independent samples t-test found no significant differences in perceived pain between groups. However, timed descent approached significance (p=0.076, p=0.088) on workout days 4 and 5. Conclusions: Administering WBV therapy post-exercise may decrease perceived pain related to DOMS and provide functional improvement via neuromuscular enhancement.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleVibe-Rate: The Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Perceived Pain Related to Muscle Sorenessen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T09:59:24Z
html.description.abstractContext: Numerous techniques have been proposed for enhanced recovery and decreased perception of pain after exercise. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may be a viable method to ameliorate post workout delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). However, the evidence to support WBV as a successful therapy is lacking. Objective: To study the effect of WBV on pain perception and amelioration of DOMS after an intense lower body workout regimen. Participants: 24 healthy, untrained volunteers aged 18 to 26, randomized to WBV group and control group. Intervention: Participants performed a workout regimen of six lower body exercises every other day for three weeks. WBV group was exposed to 5 minutes of vibration after each workout. Visual analog scale (VAS) and numeric rating scale (NRS) used to measure changes in perceived pain. Timed descent of a flight of stairs used to measure the effect of pain on performance. Perceived pain and timed descent were recorded on all workout days. Results: Independent samples t-test found no significant differences in perceived pain between groups. However, timed descent approached significance (p=0.076, p=0.088) on workout days 4 and 5. Conclusions: Administering WBV therapy post-exercise may decrease perceived pain related to DOMS and provide functional improvement via neuromuscular enhancement.


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