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dc.contributor.advisorMehl, Matthias
dc.contributor.authorSoriano, Emily Clark*
dc.creatorSoriano, Emily Clarken_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T19:20:55Z
dc.date.available2013-08-09T19:20:55Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/297783
dc.description.abstractFirst-person plural pronoun use (we-talk) by couples may be an implicit marker of communal coping, a process by which partners view a problem or stressor as "ours" rather than "yours" or "mine", and is associated with adaptive relationship functioning and individual health outcomes (Lyons, Mickelson, Sullivan, & Coyne, 1998). The present study examined we-talk in couples undergoing treatment for problematic alcohol use, hypothesizing that greater we-talk during therapy would be associated with successful drinking outcomes for patients. Thirty-three couples with male partners who had problematic alcohol use participated in either couple-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or Family Systems Therapy (FST). Transcripts of couples’ speech, derived from a baseline interaction task and two subsequent therapy sessions and analyzed using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software, provided measures of pronoun use for each partner. Results indicated that greater spouse we-talk at baseline was associated with successful drinking outcomes for patients at therapy termination. Increases in couple we-talk during therapy also predicted successful drinking outcomes, and for couples participating in the CBT, greater we-talk mid-therapy predicted successful outcomes. These findings provide additional evidence for the prognostic significance of couple we-talk and communal coping as a possible mechanism of change in couple-focused interventions.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleWe-Talk, Communal Coping, and Alcohol Abstinence During Couple-Focused Interventions for Problem Drinkersen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-30T09:42:59Z
html.description.abstractFirst-person plural pronoun use (we-talk) by couples may be an implicit marker of communal coping, a process by which partners view a problem or stressor as "ours" rather than "yours" or "mine", and is associated with adaptive relationship functioning and individual health outcomes (Lyons, Mickelson, Sullivan, & Coyne, 1998). The present study examined we-talk in couples undergoing treatment for problematic alcohol use, hypothesizing that greater we-talk during therapy would be associated with successful drinking outcomes for patients. Thirty-three couples with male partners who had problematic alcohol use participated in either couple-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or Family Systems Therapy (FST). Transcripts of couples’ speech, derived from a baseline interaction task and two subsequent therapy sessions and analyzed using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software, provided measures of pronoun use for each partner. Results indicated that greater spouse we-talk at baseline was associated with successful drinking outcomes for patients at therapy termination. Increases in couple we-talk during therapy also predicted successful drinking outcomes, and for couples participating in the CBT, greater we-talk mid-therapy predicted successful outcomes. These findings provide additional evidence for the prognostic significance of couple we-talk and communal coping as a possible mechanism of change in couple-focused interventions.


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