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dc.contributor.authorDvoracek, M. J.
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, S. H.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T16:54:12Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T16:54:12Z
dc.date.issued1971-04-23
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300120
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1971 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - April 22-23, 1971, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractThe southern bed of the ogallala aquifer is hydrologically isolated from all outside areas of recharge, requiring local precipitation for all natural recharge. Current withdrawals are so much greater than natural recharge that it appears that artificial recharge affords the only means of establishing at least a pseudo-balance. A number of observation wells were drilled at Texas Tech University, and subsequently capped until recharge water became available. The initial recharge was 2.5 af over 12 days, at a rate of 120 gpm for about the first day, after which 60 gpm was relatively constant. Approximately 1 month later, 1.2 af were recharged over 3 days at rates ranging over 140-90 gpm. It became evident that a cavity was present at the bottom of the hole being recharged. On a later recharge occasion, the cavity seemed to have enlarged. During a period of 2 years more than 28 af of surface runoff water have been recharged through the shallow hole with increases in recharge rates for each subsequent recharge period. The nature of this phenomenon and the cavities are not understood. This may represent the long sought after answer to recharge of the aquifer, but much more extensive research needs to be done.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater rechargeen_US
dc.subjectAquifersen_US
dc.subjectObservation wellsen_US
dc.subjectHydrogeologyen_US
dc.subjectShallow wellsen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectGreat Plainsen_US
dc.subjectSemiarid climatesen_US
dc.subjectAquifer characteristicsen_US
dc.subjectOn-site data collectionsen_US
dc.subjectSedimentsen_US
dc.subjectSoil pipingen_US
dc.subjectOgallala aquiferen_US
dc.titleRecharging the Ogallala Formation Using Shallow Holesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural Engineering Department, Texas Tech Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T04:02:57Z
html.description.abstractThe southern bed of the ogallala aquifer is hydrologically isolated from all outside areas of recharge, requiring local precipitation for all natural recharge. Current withdrawals are so much greater than natural recharge that it appears that artificial recharge affords the only means of establishing at least a pseudo-balance. A number of observation wells were drilled at Texas Tech University, and subsequently capped until recharge water became available. The initial recharge was 2.5 af over 12 days, at a rate of 120 gpm for about the first day, after which 60 gpm was relatively constant. Approximately 1 month later, 1.2 af were recharged over 3 days at rates ranging over 140-90 gpm. It became evident that a cavity was present at the bottom of the hole being recharged. On a later recharge occasion, the cavity seemed to have enlarged. During a period of 2 years more than 28 af of surface runoff water have been recharged through the shallow hole with increases in recharge rates for each subsequent recharge period. The nature of this phenomenon and the cavities are not understood. This may represent the long sought after answer to recharge of the aquifer, but much more extensive research needs to be done.


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