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dc.contributor.authorBoster, Mark A.*
dc.contributor.authorGum, Russell L.*
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T18:16:16Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T18:16:16Z
dc.date.issued1972-05-06
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300136
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1972 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - May 5-6, 1972, Prescott, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractIncreased useer intensity of the Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park and Monument required the national park service and the Colorado River outfitters association to adopt new policies to improve the quality of river trips and to protect the river. This study was undertaken to gain a greater awareness and understanding of visitor expectations, perceptions, interactions, satisfactions and dissatisfactions by analysis of response to a questionnaire mailed to a random sample of 2,622 past river runners from which a 65 percent return was received. Analysis of individual question tabulation and multivariate data-cluster analysis were performed. Users found crowding or user density to be at least tolerable. The largest group of runners were average in wilderness or other activities, and low relative to less strenuous activities. A large group of runners had relatively little experience in the wilderness. A large group of runners enjoyed the trip, desired more regulations, and were moderate about taking more trips. A large group rated the trip as a wilderness adventure which provided the opportunity to 'get away'. Cluster analysis is shown to be a useful tool of policy-making institutions.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectColorado Riveren_US
dc.subjectScenic highwaysen_US
dc.subjectRecreation demanden_US
dc.subjectRecreation facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectPsychological aspectsen_US
dc.subjectRiver basin developmenten_US
dc.subjectPublic accessen_US
dc.subjectPublic benefitsen_US
dc.subjectAnalysisen_US
dc.subjectRiver regulationen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectInstitutionsen_US
dc.subjectNational parksen_US
dc.subjectGrand Canyon National Park and Monumenten_US
dc.subjectColorado River Outfitters Associationen_US
dc.titleAn Investigation of Colorado River Trips: A User Studyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-28T04:30:45Z
html.description.abstractIncreased useer intensity of the Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park and Monument required the national park service and the Colorado River outfitters association to adopt new policies to improve the quality of river trips and to protect the river. This study was undertaken to gain a greater awareness and understanding of visitor expectations, perceptions, interactions, satisfactions and dissatisfactions by analysis of response to a questionnaire mailed to a random sample of 2,622 past river runners from which a 65 percent return was received. Analysis of individual question tabulation and multivariate data-cluster analysis were performed. Users found crowding or user density to be at least tolerable. The largest group of runners were average in wilderness or other activities, and low relative to less strenuous activities. A large group of runners had relatively little experience in the wilderness. A large group of runners enjoyed the trip, desired more regulations, and were moderate about taking more trips. A large group rated the trip as a wilderness adventure which provided the opportunity to 'get away'. Cluster analysis is shown to be a useful tool of policy-making institutions.


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