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dc.contributor.authorIngebo, Paul A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T20:25:26Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T20:25:26Z
dc.date.issued1972-05-06
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300148
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1972 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - May 5-6, 1972, Prescott, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractChaparral covers 4 million acres in Arizona. There is interest in determining how much these lands contribute to surface water supply, and how this contribution could be changed by conversion of chaparral cover to grass or grass forb. Results from treatment in the Whitespar watersheds are interpreted. Live oak and true mountain mahogany dominate the study area, which averages 22.7 inches of annual precipitation. Whitespar B watershed was converted to grasses in 1967, and litter was not disturbed. The 246 acre watershed produced more streamflow than the untreated, 303-acre control which tended to remain intermittent. Prior to treatment, streamflow in both watersheds was quite well synchronized. Watershed b has since had continual flow. Winter flows contribute about 77 percent of the increased streamflow volume. The degree of effect is still under study, but a new rainfall-runoff relationship for the treated watershed is necessitated.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectChaparralen_US
dc.subjectGrassesen_US
dc.subjectStreamflowen_US
dc.subjectWater supplyen_US
dc.subjectWater harvestingen_US
dc.subjectSurface watersen_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectForest managementen_US
dc.subjectRainfall-runoff relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectTreatmentsen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.titleConverting Chaparral to Grass to Increase Streamflowen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentRocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Stationen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-27T10:47:04Z
html.description.abstractChaparral covers 4 million acres in Arizona. There is interest in determining how much these lands contribute to surface water supply, and how this contribution could be changed by conversion of chaparral cover to grass or grass forb. Results from treatment in the Whitespar watersheds are interpreted. Live oak and true mountain mahogany dominate the study area, which averages 22.7 inches of annual precipitation. Whitespar B watershed was converted to grasses in 1967, and litter was not disturbed. The 246 acre watershed produced more streamflow than the untreated, 303-acre control which tended to remain intermittent. Prior to treatment, streamflow in both watersheds was quite well synchronized. Watershed b has since had continual flow. Winter flows contribute about 77 percent of the increased streamflow volume. The degree of effect is still under study, but a new rainfall-runoff relationship for the treated watershed is necessitated.


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