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dc.contributor.authorHolub, Hugh
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T20:24:05Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T20:24:05Z
dc.date.issued1972-05-06
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300161
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1972 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - May 5-6, 1972, Prescott, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractPressure is being brought to bear on national resources of air, earth, and water in the growing cities in the arid southwest. Legal questions involved in capturing urban runoff and putting it to a beneficial use are examined. Urbanization of a watershed results in a 3 to 5 fold increase in runoff amounts. Legal aspects include tort liability from floods, water rights to the increased flows, land use restrictions along banks and flood plains, condemnation of land for park development and flowage easements, financing problems, zoning applications, and coordination of governmental bodies responsible for parks, storm drainage and related services. Urban runoff is the most obvious legal problem in the tort liability area. It appears feasible to divert small quantities of water from urban wastes for recreational uses which provide flood control benefits. It appears that municipalities could appropriate increased flows caused by urbanization. The ultimate legal questions remain to be resolved by legislation, litigation or extension of the appropriative system.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectLegal aspectsen_US
dc.subjectUrban runoffen_US
dc.subjectSouthwest U.S.en_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectUrbanizationen_US
dc.subjectBeneficial useen_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectFloodsen_US
dc.subjectWater rightsen_US
dc.subjectLand useen_US
dc.subjectRegulationen_US
dc.subjectBanksen_US
dc.subjectFlood plainsen_US
dc.subjectCondemnationen_US
dc.subjectParksen_US
dc.subjectEasementsen_US
dc.subjectFinancingen_US
dc.subjectZoningen_US
dc.subjectCoordinationen_US
dc.subjectStorm drainsen_US
dc.subjectDiversionen_US
dc.subjectRecreation facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectFlood controlen_US
dc.subjectLegislationen_US
dc.subjectTort liabilityen_US
dc.subjectLitigationen_US
dc.titleSome Legal Problems of Urban Runoffen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Law, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-18T17:35:32Z
html.description.abstractPressure is being brought to bear on national resources of air, earth, and water in the growing cities in the arid southwest. Legal questions involved in capturing urban runoff and putting it to a beneficial use are examined. Urbanization of a watershed results in a 3 to 5 fold increase in runoff amounts. Legal aspects include tort liability from floods, water rights to the increased flows, land use restrictions along banks and flood plains, condemnation of land for park development and flowage easements, financing problems, zoning applications, and coordination of governmental bodies responsible for parks, storm drainage and related services. Urban runoff is the most obvious legal problem in the tort liability area. It appears feasible to divert small quantities of water from urban wastes for recreational uses which provide flood control benefits. It appears that municipalities could appropriate increased flows caused by urbanization. The ultimate legal questions remain to be resolved by legislation, litigation or extension of the appropriative system.


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