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dc.contributor.authorKaplan, Marc G.
dc.contributor.authorZwolinski, Malcolm J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-29T17:41:52Z
dc.date.available2013-08-29T17:41:52Z
dc.date.issued1973-05-05
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300264
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1973 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - May 4-5, 1973, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractAn infiltration- wetting agent study, using the wetting agent "WATER-IN", was conducted in the ponderosa pine forest type of east central Arizona. An application rate of 10 gallons of wetting agent per acre was used on bare mineral soil and on ponderosa pine litter. The infiltration rate was measured by a modified North Fork infiltrometer. It was found that "WATER-IN" significantly increased water runoff when applied to litter, but, when applied to bare mineral soil, "WATER-IN" caused a significant increase in water infiltration. The wetting agent did not significantly affect antecedent moisture, soil particle distribution, litter water holding capacity, or litter bulk density. It is presently hypothesized that the increase in water infiltration on treated bare mineral soil is due to a decrease in the average bulk density of the surface inch of soil. The increase in runoff when litter is treated is probably due to an interaction, either physical, chemical, or both, between the humus layer and "WATER-IN ", creating a hydrophobic condition where one did not exist before.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWettingen_US
dc.subjectInfiltration ratesen_US
dc.subjectLitter bulk densityen_US
dc.subjectRunoffen_US
dc.subjectPonderosa pine treesen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectInfiltrometersen_US
dc.subjectSoil moistureen_US
dc.subjectErosionen_US
dc.subjectSurfactantsen_US
dc.subjectResinsen_US
dc.subjectAntecedent moisture contenten_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectHydrophobic soilsen_US
dc.titleEffects of a Wetting Agent on the Infiltration Characteristics of a Ponderosa Pine Soilen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Watershed Management, University of Arizona, Tucsonen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-18T04:34:48Z
html.description.abstractAn infiltration- wetting agent study, using the wetting agent "WATER-IN", was conducted in the ponderosa pine forest type of east central Arizona. An application rate of 10 gallons of wetting agent per acre was used on bare mineral soil and on ponderosa pine litter. The infiltration rate was measured by a modified North Fork infiltrometer. It was found that "WATER-IN" significantly increased water runoff when applied to litter, but, when applied to bare mineral soil, "WATER-IN" caused a significant increase in water infiltration. The wetting agent did not significantly affect antecedent moisture, soil particle distribution, litter water holding capacity, or litter bulk density. It is presently hypothesized that the increase in water infiltration on treated bare mineral soil is due to a decrease in the average bulk density of the surface inch of soil. The increase in runoff when litter is treated is probably due to an interaction, either physical, chemical, or both, between the humus layer and "WATER-IN ", creating a hydrophobic condition where one did not exist before.


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