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dc.contributor.authorWallace, D. E.
dc.contributor.authorSchreiber, H. A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-29T22:40:04Z
dc.date.available2013-08-29T22:40:04Z
dc.date.issued1974-04-20
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300350
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1974 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - April 19-20, 1974, Flagstaff, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study attempts to determine the water quality changes in stock tanks and what factors are instrumental in the changes, and to assess the effects of the changes. Algal growth was the most prominent change taking place in the tanks with time. Little change in the water chemistry was noted until just before the tanks dried up. As algae died, ions tied up by the algae were released to the water, causing an increase in concentration of many of the nutrients. In order to determine the impact of various factors on algal growth, the data from eight stock tanks were analyzed by stepwise linear regression. Although 20 variables were used in the complete analysis, six variables were associated with 56.3 percent of the variance: time (since first sampling), total n, potassium, pH, inflow (recharge to the tanks), and hco3 concentration. Time and total n explained 51.3 percent of the variance, and potassium increased the variance to 52.8 percent. The pH reversed the relative positions of time and total n, with total n becoming dominant. The last two factors, inflow and hco3 were negative (resulting in a decrease in algal population) and increased the coefficient of variance to 56.3 percent.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectStock wateren_US
dc.subjectPondsen_US
dc.subjectAlgaeen_US
dc.subjectWater chemistryen_US
dc.subjectRegression analysisen_US
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectFarm pondsen_US
dc.subjectWater harvestingen_US
dc.subjectStanding watersen_US
dc.subjectWater storageen_US
dc.subjectNutrientsen_US
dc.subjectHydrogen ion concentrationen_US
dc.subjectInorganic compoundsen_US
dc.subjectWater analysisen_US
dc.subjectVariabilityen_US
dc.subjectTimeen_US
dc.subjectNitrogen compoundsen_US
dc.subjectPotassiumen_US
dc.subjectInflowen_US
dc.subjectBicarbonatesen_US
dc.subjectAlgal growthen_US
dc.subjectStock tanksen_US
dc.subjectStepwise linear regressionen_US
dc.titleTime-Related Changes in Water Quality of Stock Tanks of Southeastern Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSouthwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Arizona 85705en_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T19:37:10Z
html.description.abstractThis study attempts to determine the water quality changes in stock tanks and what factors are instrumental in the changes, and to assess the effects of the changes. Algal growth was the most prominent change taking place in the tanks with time. Little change in the water chemistry was noted until just before the tanks dried up. As algae died, ions tied up by the algae were released to the water, causing an increase in concentration of many of the nutrients. In order to determine the impact of various factors on algal growth, the data from eight stock tanks were analyzed by stepwise linear regression. Although 20 variables were used in the complete analysis, six variables were associated with 56.3 percent of the variance: time (since first sampling), total n, potassium, pH, inflow (recharge to the tanks), and hco3 concentration. Time and total n explained 51.3 percent of the variance, and potassium increased the variance to 52.8 percent. The pH reversed the relative positions of time and total n, with total n becoming dominant. The last two factors, inflow and hco3 were negative (resulting in a decrease in algal population) and increased the coefficient of variance to 56.3 percent.


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