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dc.contributor.authorHeede, Burchard H.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-30T17:33:28Z
dc.date.available2013-08-30T17:33:28Z
dc.date.issued1975-04-12
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300496
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1975 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - April 11-12, 1975, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, watershed management is concerned with water and sediment yield, vegetation, soils, and meteorology, but not with geomorphology. Often it is in this field that the explanation can be found for the formation and present condition of a watershed and its future development. Examples are presented to demonstrate that factors in the hydraulic geometry of streams indicate whether a watershed is in an active stage of landform development, or is in dynamic equilibrium. Some general guides for the practitioner are provided. Watershed management research cannot afford to ignore the basic geomorphic setting of watersheds. If geomorphology is not considered, the researcher's results could be misinterpreted.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWatershed managementen_US
dc.subjectGeomorphologyen_US
dc.subjectStreamsen_US
dc.subjectLand formingen_US
dc.subjectStreamflowen_US
dc.subjectTopographyen_US
dc.subjectEquilibriumen_US
dc.subjectSedimentationen_US
dc.subjectErosionen_US
dc.subjectDynamic equilibriumen_US
dc.titleWatershed Indicators of Landform Developmenten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona State University, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentColorado State University, Fort Collinsen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T23:01:57Z
html.description.abstractTraditionally, watershed management is concerned with water and sediment yield, vegetation, soils, and meteorology, but not with geomorphology. Often it is in this field that the explanation can be found for the formation and present condition of a watershed and its future development. Examples are presented to demonstrate that factors in the hydraulic geometry of streams indicate whether a watershed is in an active stage of landform development, or is in dynamic equilibrium. Some general guides for the practitioner are provided. Watershed management research cannot afford to ignore the basic geomorphic setting of watersheds. If geomorphology is not considered, the researcher's results could be misinterpreted.


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