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dc.contributor.authorFink, Dwayne H.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Stanley T.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-30T17:39:35Z
dc.date.available2013-08-30T17:39:35Z
dc.date.issued1975-04-12
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/300502
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1975 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - April 11-12, 1975, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractWater can be supplied to many arid areas by harvesting the precipitation that falls on artificially prepared water-repellent soil catchments. The failure, in 1973, of wax-treated water harvesting catchment led to this study which indicates that the failure was due to swelling and shrinking of the treated soil which caused complete structural breakdown and loss of repellency. The laboratory freeze-thaw studies demonstrated that the smoother the plot, the less chance of freeze-thaw damage. Generally, coarser-textured soil can withstand freeze-thaw cycles better than finer-textured soils. Soil properties, other than texture, may also affect resistance to damage by freeze-thaw cycles. Increasing the repellent application rate may improve resistance to breakdown.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWaterproofingen_US
dc.subjectFreeze-thaw testsen_US
dc.subjectSoil textureen_US
dc.subjectSoil propertiesen_US
dc.subjectWater harvestingen_US
dc.subjectWater yielden_US
dc.subjectWatersheds (basins)en_US
dc.subjectRunoffen_US
dc.subjectWater repellentsen_US
dc.titleFreeze-Thaw Effects on Soils Treated for Water Repellencyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentU. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040en_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T13:51:49Z
html.description.abstractWater can be supplied to many arid areas by harvesting the precipitation that falls on artificially prepared water-repellent soil catchments. The failure, in 1973, of wax-treated water harvesting catchment led to this study which indicates that the failure was due to swelling and shrinking of the treated soil which caused complete structural breakdown and loss of repellency. The laboratory freeze-thaw studies demonstrated that the smoother the plot, the less chance of freeze-thaw damage. Generally, coarser-textured soil can withstand freeze-thaw cycles better than finer-textured soils. Soil properties, other than texture, may also affect resistance to damage by freeze-thaw cycles. Increasing the repellent application rate may improve resistance to breakdown.


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