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dc.contributor.authorDavenport, David C.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-04T21:51:12Z
dc.date.available2013-09-04T21:51:12Z
dc.date.issued1977-04-16
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301020
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1977 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona Academy of Science - April 15-16, 1977, Las Vegas, Nevadaen_US
dc.description.abstractTranspiration rates (T) of riparian phreatophytes can be high. Antitranspirant (AT) sprays can curtail T without the ecological imbalance made by eradication. Saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) and cottonwood (Populus sp.) in 15-gal. drums enabled replicated trials on isolated plants or on canopies. T of isolate saltcedar plants could be 2x that of plants in a fairly dense canopy. T for a unit ground area of saltcedar varied from 2.2 (sparse -) to 15.8 (dense-stand) mm/day in July at Davis. Extrapolation of experimental T data to field sites must, therefore, be made carefully. Wax -based ATs increased foliar diffusive resistance (R), and reduced T of saltcedar and cottonwood 32-38% initially and 10% after 3 weeks. R increased naturally in the afternoon when evaporative demand was high and if soil water was low. Nocturnal T of salt cedar was 10% of day T. AT effectiveness increased with a higher ratio of day: night hours, and with lower soil water stress. Therefore, AT will be most effective on long summer days in riparian areas where ground water is available.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectPhreatophytesen_US
dc.subjectTranspirationen_US
dc.subjectAntitranspirentsen_US
dc.subjectTranspiration controlen_US
dc.subjectChemcontrolen_US
dc.subjectStomataen_US
dc.subjectWater conservationen_US
dc.subjectWater utilizationen_US
dc.subjectConsumptive useen_US
dc.subjectWater yield improvementen_US
dc.subjectBalance of natureen_US
dc.subjectThin filmsen_US
dc.subjectDesert plantsen_US
dc.subjectTamarisken_US
dc.subjectCottonwoodsen_US
dc.subjectArid landsen_US
dc.subjectDiurnalen_US
dc.subjectNocturnalen_US
dc.titleReducing Phreatophyte Transpirationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Land Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davisen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T14:06:12Z
html.description.abstractTranspiration rates (T) of riparian phreatophytes can be high. Antitranspirant (AT) sprays can curtail T without the ecological imbalance made by eradication. Saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) and cottonwood (Populus sp.) in 15-gal. drums enabled replicated trials on isolated plants or on canopies. T of isolate saltcedar plants could be 2x that of plants in a fairly dense canopy. T for a unit ground area of saltcedar varied from 2.2 (sparse -) to 15.8 (dense-stand) mm/day in July at Davis. Extrapolation of experimental T data to field sites must, therefore, be made carefully. Wax -based ATs increased foliar diffusive resistance (R), and reduced T of saltcedar and cottonwood 32-38% initially and 10% after 3 weeks. R increased naturally in the afternoon when evaporative demand was high and if soil water was low. Nocturnal T of salt cedar was 10% of day T. AT effectiveness increased with a higher ratio of day: night hours, and with lower soil water stress. Therefore, AT will be most effective on long summer days in riparian areas where ground water is available.


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