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dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Thomas M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Stephen E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-06T15:31:53Z
dc.date.available2013-09-06T15:31:53Z
dc.date.issued1981-05-02
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301277
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1981 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona - Nevada Academy of Science - May 1-2, 1981, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractAnticipating a surge in the future growth of the Tucson urban area accompanied by a need for the preservation of the local groundwater resource, Tucson Water is planning for a major transition in its source of supply during the next fifty years. The completion of the Central Arizona Project to the Tucson area represents the primary ingredient to the formulation of a future water supply plan for the community. Tucson, which presently relies totally upon groundwater for its potable water supply, is diligently preparing to accept its first surface water source. The task of planning for this event is extremely complex and is further hampered by the fact that many critical factors relating to the Tucson Division of the Central Arizona Project are yet undefined. Tucson Water engineers utilize contemporary computerized hydraulic models as tools to define an array of technical solutions to the problem of accomplishing a major conversion from a multi-point system source to a predominantly single source of supply. Elements such as construction, operation, and maintenance costs associated with water treatment and delivery systems are addressed.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.titleThe Alternatives and Impacts Associated with a Future Water Source Transition for Tucson Wateren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726en_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T14:12:35Z
html.description.abstractAnticipating a surge in the future growth of the Tucson urban area accompanied by a need for the preservation of the local groundwater resource, Tucson Water is planning for a major transition in its source of supply during the next fifty years. The completion of the Central Arizona Project to the Tucson area represents the primary ingredient to the formulation of a future water supply plan for the community. Tucson, which presently relies totally upon groundwater for its potable water supply, is diligently preparing to accept its first surface water source. The task of planning for this event is extremely complex and is further hampered by the fact that many critical factors relating to the Tucson Division of the Central Arizona Project are yet undefined. Tucson Water engineers utilize contemporary computerized hydraulic models as tools to define an array of technical solutions to the problem of accomplishing a major conversion from a multi-point system source to a predominantly single source of supply. Elements such as construction, operation, and maintenance costs associated with water treatment and delivery systems are addressed.


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