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dc.contributor.authorBuras, Nathan
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-06T15:55:02Z
dc.date.available2013-09-06T15:55:02Z
dc.date.issued1982-04-24
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301309
dc.descriptionFrom the Proceedings of the 1982 Meetings of the Arizona Section - American Water Resources Assn. and the Hydrology Section - Arizona - Nevada Academy of Science - April 24,1982, Tempe, Arizonaen_US
dc.description.abstractWater and energy interact strongly in Arizona. The Arizona State Water Plan mentions that under 1970 normalized conditions 60% of total use in the State was from groundwater aquifers, a proportion which may have increased in the last decade. The utilization of groundwater resources requires substantial amounts of power. In addition, the Central Arizona Project is an energy- intensive pr9ject: its Granite Reef aqueduct will require a pumping lift of 1,084 ft (352 m) using about 1.665 x 10⁹ kwh/year. The Tucson aqueduct component will have an additional lift of 997 ft (304 m). The hydropower installations planned within the CAP will have only limited generating capacities: Agua Fria 3 Mw, Granite Reef 3.5 Mw, and Maxwell 11 Mw. The remainder of the load will have to be picked up by thermal power plants and by pumped storage schemes which, by the year 2000, may need over 100,000 acre-feet per year to make up evaporative losses. Thus, energy is required to make water available to users, and water is a necessary ingredient in energy-related activities. These and other water-energy interactions in the Lower Colorado Basin are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.titleEnergy and Water Resources Interactions in Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, 85721en_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-29T21:38:34Z
html.description.abstractWater and energy interact strongly in Arizona. The Arizona State Water Plan mentions that under 1970 normalized conditions 60% of total use in the State was from groundwater aquifers, a proportion which may have increased in the last decade. The utilization of groundwater resources requires substantial amounts of power. In addition, the Central Arizona Project is an energy- intensive pr9ject: its Granite Reef aqueduct will require a pumping lift of 1,084 ft (352 m) using about 1.665 x 10⁹ kwh/year. The Tucson aqueduct component will have an additional lift of 997 ft (304 m). The hydropower installations planned within the CAP will have only limited generating capacities: Agua Fria 3 Mw, Granite Reef 3.5 Mw, and Maxwell 11 Mw. The remainder of the load will have to be picked up by thermal power plants and by pumped storage schemes which, by the year 2000, may need over 100,000 acre-feet per year to make up evaporative losses. Thus, energy is required to make water available to users, and water is a necessary ingredient in energy-related activities. These and other water-energy interactions in the Lower Colorado Basin are discussed.


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