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dc.contributor.advisorSallaz, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchrank, Zachary
dc.creatorSchrank, Zacharyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-25T19:14:14Z
dc.date.available2013-11-25T19:14:14Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/305759
dc.description.abstractThe market for local organic foods in the United States has grown tremendously in recent years. Compared to a meager existence just a decade ago, local organic options now flourish through the form of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), thousands of farmers markets, community cooperative grocery stores, and upscale restaurants. Interestingly, the greatest percentage of growth in farmers markets in the US has occurred in the last 2-3 years during the Great Recession despite economic downturn. This changing nature of agriculture and new developments of alternative niche markets have captured the attention of scholars. Most studies tend to focus on economic, organizational, or even nutritional elements reflected in the food industry. Less emphasis, however, has been devoted to the roles of cultural consumption, values, and desires that have propagated the swift and substantial growth of this movement. Direct sales in local organic niche markets and the CSA model provide an atmosphere for repetitive interpersonal interaction between farmer and buyer around a product infused with shared meaning. I utilize ethnographic data from an extended case of a local organic farm in Southern Arizona and interviews with over 50 of their CSA members. This dissertation addresses how and why both producers and consumers co-produce alternative visions and meanings that sustain a viable local niche food economy. I argue that the members involved in this niche market sector hold unified reactions against the global expansionary aims of food corporations. Inverse to market forces, the cultural and economic ethos driving this movement originates from appreciation for craft production as an expression of commodity de-fetishization, personal investment and embeddedness in local economies, and desires for authenticity in community and consumption.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAuthenticityen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Supported Agricultureen_US
dc.subjectLocalizationen_US
dc.subjectOrganicen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subjectAgrarianen_US
dc.titleAn Inverted Market: Niche Market Dynamics Of The Local Organic Food Movementen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZavisca, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergesen, Alberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSallaz, Jeffen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T17:26:10Z
html.description.abstractThe market for local organic foods in the United States has grown tremendously in recent years. Compared to a meager existence just a decade ago, local organic options now flourish through the form of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), thousands of farmers markets, community cooperative grocery stores, and upscale restaurants. Interestingly, the greatest percentage of growth in farmers markets in the US has occurred in the last 2-3 years during the Great Recession despite economic downturn. This changing nature of agriculture and new developments of alternative niche markets have captured the attention of scholars. Most studies tend to focus on economic, organizational, or even nutritional elements reflected in the food industry. Less emphasis, however, has been devoted to the roles of cultural consumption, values, and desires that have propagated the swift and substantial growth of this movement. Direct sales in local organic niche markets and the CSA model provide an atmosphere for repetitive interpersonal interaction between farmer and buyer around a product infused with shared meaning. I utilize ethnographic data from an extended case of a local organic farm in Southern Arizona and interviews with over 50 of their CSA members. This dissertation addresses how and why both producers and consumers co-produce alternative visions and meanings that sustain a viable local niche food economy. I argue that the members involved in this niche market sector hold unified reactions against the global expansionary aims of food corporations. Inverse to market forces, the cultural and economic ethos driving this movement originates from appreciation for craft production as an expression of commodity de-fetishization, personal investment and embeddedness in local economies, and desires for authenticity in community and consumption.


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