• Arizona Water Resource No. 1 (October 1997)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-10)
      This special supplement provides news and information about El Niño. In a sense, the publication will serve as an El Niño Times, informing Arizona water professionals and others interested in water affairs of plans, projects and activities relating to weather affected by El Niño. The publication will concentrate on events occurring in Arizona but also will provide more general information about El Niño and its expected effects.
    • Arizona Water Resource No. 2 (December 1997)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-12)
      This year's El Niño already has fully earned its claim to fame; this is the first such event predicted so far in advance. Also, the extent to which this year's event is being studied and observed is unprecedented.
    • Arizona Water Resource No. 3 (February 1998)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-02)
      Because of El Niño's seemingly late start and uncertain progress, a pattern that did not conform to some early predictions, some people in the western United States question what effect El Niño finally will have on the area; some even believe the event might be diminishing. El Niño, however, should not be lightly dismissed, as recent rains demonstrate. A January report from the U.S. Weather Service's Tucson office confirms El Niño's continued presence: 'We are currently in a strong El Niño episode, which is forecast to continue through April 1998. This episode is similar in magnitude and aerial extent to that of 1982-83, which is considered the strongest of the century."
    • Arizona Water Resource No. 4 (June 1998)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-06)
      Increased precipitation from El Niño ensures more abundant vegetative growth, which in turn raises concern about increased fire hazards, especially during Arizona's summer fire season. Whatever fire hazards are due this year to El Niño are not being experienced evenly throughout the state, however, with some areas actually having less fires. And, in some cases, El Niño's legacy may not be apparent this season, but instead be evident by fires in future years.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 8 No. 4 (January-February 2000)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-01)
      Dropping groundwater levels are a major concern in Arizona, with laws and policies adopted to control the decline in various areas of the state. Yet where irrigation occurs, and groundwater pumping has either been reduced or stopped, rising groundwater levels can be a problem, in both agricultural and urban areas. Laden with salts and other chemicals, rising groundwater can threaten the productivity of the land and cause other problems as well.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 8 No. 5 (March-April 2000)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-03)
      The need to control groundwater use in Arizona had long been apparent, but the will to act was lacking. In 1980, various interests rose to the occasion and negotiated the Groundwater Management Act. Signed into law on June 12, 1980, 20 years ago this year, the GMA became the law of the land.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 8 No. 6 (May-June 2000)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-05)
      In working to ensure adequate water supplies, a quest that is critical and ongoing, officials must not overlook another concern of great importance - the collection and preservation of state water records and information. Obtaining consumable water supplies and managing permanent state water records are both areas of concern.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 9 No. 1 (July-August 2000)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-07)
      Settling Central Arizona Project issues has evolved into a long-running and complex saga. In a recent development, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation halted work on an environmental impact statement (EIS) reviewing proposed modifications of existing CAP water allocations. BuRec had little choice in the matter since Senator Jon Kyl inserted into an appropriations bill an amendment to cut off funding for work on the EIS.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 9 No. 4 (January-February 2001)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-01)
      The generation of electrical power is a growth industry in Arizona, with 19 power plants proposed for various areas of the state. The surge in the number of power plants wanting to operate within Arizona is a relatively recent occurrence. The movement began in the fall of 1999 when a power plant was proposed for the Kingman area and continues with Nogales and Vail mentioned as possible future sights. One official remarked that Arizona promises to be a hub for power plants.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 1 (February 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-02)
      Welcome to the premier issue of Arizona Water Resource. AWR is produced by the Arizona Water Resources Research Center at the University of Arizona. Representatives from various water organizations within the state, however, assisted in its planning and development. AWR represents a group effort at identifying a publication need within the state, and then developing a newsletter to respond to that recognized need.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 1 (Spring 2009)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe; Megdal, Sharon (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009)
      Arizona has another Wild and Scenic River; Fossil Creek with it’s the travertine geological formations and crystal clear waters now shares the same protected designation as a segment of the middle Verde River, the state’s only other Wild and Scenic River. Approving Fossil Creek’s special designation was a detail in a massive piece of legislation, the Omnibus Public Land Management Act, a package of over 160 bills, that set aside more than 2 million acres of newly protected wilderness in nine states. More than 3.3 million acres of public lands in Arizona gained permanent protection. President Obama signed the law on March 30. Fossil Creek is an Arizona success story, an environmental rags-to-riches tale. Dammed early last century for power generation, Fossil Creek’s once quick-running water was a mere a trickle until the turn of this century. In 1999, Arizona Public Service shut down the power plants, and restoration efforts commenced. The dam was lowered and diversions ceased in June 2005, restoring full flows to the creek. This is the first Arizona watercourse to have a major water retention structure retired. In its heyday Fossil Creek was considered the fourth largest travertine system in the world. Fed by underground streams, it ran year-round almost 17 miles to the Verde River, its waters rich with calcium carbonate from the limestone aquifer below. Fossil Creek was one of 86 newly established Wild and Scenic Rivers with others located in California, Idaho, Massachusetts, Oregon, Utah, Vermont and Wyoming. Efforts are underway to gain support for a Wild and Scenic listing of another Arizona River, the Blue River, a tributary to the San Francisco River. Rivers or segment of rivers are designated Wild and Scenic to protect special qualities including scenic, recreational, geologic, and fish and wildlife; they are not to be dammed or otherwise impeded to protect their free-flowing condition. The recently passed law also provides other water-related provisions benefitting the state. Funding was authorized to support the federal government’s role in a comprehensive effort to preserve wildlife habitat along the lower Colorado River. The bill also authorized the Secretary of the Interior to consider ways to supplement water supplies in the Sierra Vista Subwatershed to benefit Fort Huachuca and the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 10 (December 1992/January 1993)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992)
      Speculation abounded as to whether President Bush would sign the Omnibus Water Bill. He did so on October 30. Now Arizona and other western states are tallying their gains from this new piece of federal legislation.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 2 (March 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-03)
      In an effort to promote use of Arizona's CAP water entitlement, the Central Arizona Conservation District approved an expenditure to develop in lieu recharge projects. CAWCD has since received nine requests to participate in indirect recharge projects, with three obtaining all necessary permits and agreements to begin operations. They are the Central Arizona Irrigation and Drainage District, the Maricopa- Stanfield Irrigation and Drainage District, and the Roosevelt Water Conservation Recharge Projects.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 3 (April 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-04)
      The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently released its first stage (1992-1994) Integrated Environmental Plan for the Mexican-U.S. Border Area (see Publications, March AWR). Motivated by Congressional consideration of the North American Free Trade Act, the plan addresses potential environmental consequences of increased trade along the border.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 4 (May 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-05)
      The Central Arizona Water Conservation District's plans to promote indirect recharge (March AWR, p.1) have induced Central Arizona Project farmers to contract for the use of up to 237,500 acre-feet (af) of Colorado River water this year in addition to their normal orders. This boosts the total amount of CAP water that may be used this year by farmers in Arizona to 412,500 af. Actual usage will depend on other economic factors of putting land into production.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 5 (June 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-06)
      The Tohono O'odham (formerly Papago) Nation and the U.S. government filed suit in 1975 against groundwater pumpers in Pima County, seeking tribal water rights under the Winters doctrine. After extensive negotiations, Congress passed the Southern Arizona Water Resources Settlement Act (SAWRSA) in 1982, which called for the Nation to give up its Winters claim in exchange for 66,000 a-f of CAP water, 10,000 a-f of groundwater rights, and financial assistance in putting the water to use. Ten years and millions of dollars later, no water has been delivered, no long-term supply has been identified, no consensus has been reached on how to use the water, the lawsuit has not been dismissed, and Congress is being asked to amend SAWRSA. The most significant change from a decade ago is that today's conflict is not between the Nation and outsiders, but rather is within the Nation.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 6 (July/August 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-07)
      Governor Symington signed into law on June 1 a controversial private property rights bill that requires the Attorney General to draft guidelines for state agencies to analyze the impacts of new rules and regulations on private property use. When such impacts constitute a "constitutional taking" of private property, the State must compensate the owners.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 7 (September 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-09)
      The Governor's CAP Task Force has released a report that is as noteworthy for what it fails to recommend as for what it does (see accompanying article). The task force declined to call for any major new taxes to bail out irrigation districts so they could continue to use large portions of the state's Colorado River allocation.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 8 (October 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-10)
      The second Symposium on Settlement Indian Reserved Water Rights Claims was held in Albuquerque, NM on September 1-3 , 1992. Sponsored by the Native American Rights Fund and Western States Water Council, the symposium drew some 250 people from across the country. The symposium focused on negotiating Indian water rights settlements, and included discussions of alternative dispute resolution techniques, marketing, and jurisdiction over water use.
    • Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 9 (November 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-11)
      The cost of assuring clean water in America's public water systems is about to get a lot more expensive. And while the financial burden will be felt by nearly all water providers and their customers, small systems are especially vulnerable to the changing regulatory requirements.