• Arroyo 2010

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Lamberton, Melissa; Newman, David; Eden, Susanna; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010)
      Water and energy are fundamental components of our 21st century life, but they can no longer be considered separately. Just as producing energy consumes water, pumping, treating and distributing water requires energy. In other words, water is an energy issue; energy is a water issue. Called the water-energy nexus, this interrelationship is beginning to receive the attention it merits. This Arroyo aims to provide comprehensive and timely information to support the public discussion of this important topic.
    • Arroyo 2011

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Eden, Susanna; Glass, Tim W.; Herman, Valerie (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011)
      The process of removing salts from water to produce fresh water is known as desalination. Available technology allows seawater or brackish groundwater, which can be found in large quantities, to be converted into clean, usable water. In water scare locations this has the potential to greatly increase the fresh water supply.
    • Arroyo 2012

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Witte, Becky; Eden, Susanna; Dos Santos, Placido; Sanchez Esqueda, Josue (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012)
      The U.S-Mexico border is not only where two countries meet, but where different cultures face a common need for effective and sustainable use of the available resources. The management of resources and environmental hazards in this region is challenging. Agencies from both countries are addressing the challenge by participating in bi-national efforts to resolve the issues of water and air contamination, water resource allocation, and solid and hazardous waste disposal in the region.
    • Arroyo 2013

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Raghav, Madhumitha; Eden, Susanna; Mitchell, Katharine; Witte, Becky (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013)
      The Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has just released its 2013 annual Arroyo – a 12-page newsletter devoted to a single topic of timely interest to Arizona. This year, the topic is “Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Water,” a subject that has raised questions from the public and challenged water managers and regulators across the country. Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) are “substances we use every day for all kinds of purposes, which get flushed, washed or otherwise discarded and end up in water and soil.” They are being detected in trace amounts in the water supply, raising the need to know what risks they represent and what, if anything, should be done about them. The new Arroyo brings together current information and presents definitions, examples and study results, while describing efforts to tackle the issue. The WRRC publishes Arroyo each spring, and initial research is carried out the previous summer by the winner of the Montgomery & Associates Summer Writing Internship. The 2012 intern was Madhumitha Raghav, a Ph.D. student in Environmental Engineering at the University of Arizona.
    • Arroyo Vol. 1 No. 1 (Spring 1987)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987)
      The continued funding of the Central Arizona Project depended upon Arizona implementing water conservation measures in several critical areas in the state. Water consumption patterns in these Active Management Areas (AMAs) will be guided between 1980 and 2025 by a series of five management plans to be developed by the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR).
    • Arroyo Vol. 1 No. 2 (Summer 1987)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987)
      "Pure and simple" is an expression that does not fit when water quality is the topic. To assure the delivery of good quality, pure water is not a simple matter at all, as water quality managers well know.
    • Arroyo Vol. 2 No. 1 (Winter 1988)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987)
      That water, so common, essential and basic, should be a cornmodity to be bought and sold, marketed and transferred, may seem odd. Yet social and economic conditions in Arizona, and throughout the West, have evolved in such a way that water transfers appear as an attractive option to some and a controversial issue to others
    • Arroyo Vol. 2 No. 2 (Spring 1988)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      The Arizona Groundwater Management Act (GMA) of 1980 confronts a problem that has concerned state officials since the early 1930s: the overdraft of Arizona's groundwater resources. The GMA was not the first legislative effort in Arizona to control groundwater use. Advised that a groundwater law was a prerequisite to authorization of the Central Arizona Project (CAP), the state Legislature enacted the Critical Groundwater Code in 1948.
    • Arroyo Vol. 2 No. 3 (October 1988)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-10)
      In its effort to best use all its available water supplies, Arizona must do more than conserve water. The state must also identify and develop new water resources to support its growing population, and effluent is being increasingly looked to as an important and valuable source of water. Plans are under way to develop this resource more fully to reduce groundwater pumpage in the state. (Due to varied usages, the word "effluent" has become an imprecise term. As the word is often used, effluent may refer to untreated wastewater--or it may mean wastewater that has been treated and is available for various uses. To avoid ambiguity the term "reclaimed water" will be used when referring to water resources derived from treated effluent.)
    • Arroyo Vol. 2 No. 4 (December 1988)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-12)
      Arizona's natural attractions include deserts, mountains and canyons. Although not as noticed, another important natural feature is the state's perennial streams. Segments of such rivers as the Gila, Salt, Verde, San Pedro and the Hassayampa flow year round and support fish populations, wildlife and water-based recreation as well as sustaining rich riparian ecosystems. A concern about maintaining perennial flow at some minimal level, with possible seasonal variations, is the central issue in the instream flow debate.
    • Arroyo Vol. 3 No. 1 (April 1989)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-04)
      The changing of the Earth's climate, which is a topic of increasing concern, is a cornplex issue. Much more than a meteorological phenomenon, climate is a force that helps define our social environment, as well as our relationship to the natural world. Therefore, the effects of climate change -- whether parts of the earth are becoming wetter or drier, or hotter or colder -- would be broad and profound.
    • Arroyo Vol. 3 No. 2 (August 1989)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-08)
      The U.S.- Mexico boundary is a political division and, although surveyed, mapped and patrolled, cannot completely determine the two nations' rights to the water resources along their common border. The flow of rivers and streams and the occurrence of groundwater are largely determined by nonpolitical, natural forces. As a result, the United States and Mexico must often negotiate the allocation and use of border water resources.
    • Arroyo Vol. 3 No. 3 (December 1989)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-12)
      A concern for Indian water rights has come to be one of the nation's most important water resource issues. Its importance is demonstrated by the fact that Indian water rights claims are presently being adjudicated in almost every western state. These rights are usually very senior and also unquantified. How conflicts over these claims will be settled will affect water use and management throughout the West.
    • Arroyo Vol. 4 No. 1 (April 1990)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990-04)
      Although many and varied, all sources of water pollution are classified as either point or nonpoint. Pollution comes from a point source if its origins are distinct and identifiable; hence, point source is also called an end-of-the-pipe source. Pollution from point sources can usually be quantified, often by direct measurement. Point sources can often be regulated effectively with federal and state permits.
    • Arroyo Vol. 4 No. 2 (June 1990)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990-06)
      Semiarid, with a scarcity of water resources, Arizona might seem an unlikely state to be threatened by flooding. Flooding in Arizona, however, does indeed pose serious threats to life and property in the state. In fact, because of erosion and scouring in unstable stream channels, certain flood hazards exist in the arid Southwest that are not generally present in humid regions of the United States.
    • Arroyo Vol. 4 No. 3 (October 1990)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990-10)
      Enacted in 1980, Arizona's Groundwater Management Act (GMA) is a decade old. The ten year anniversary of the GMA provides an appropriate opportunity to review the act and interpret its effectiveness. Is the GMA on track toward its stated goal of controlling the severe groundwater overdraft occurring in various areas of the state?
    • Arroyo Vol. 4 No. 4 (February 1991)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991-02)
      Drought in Arizona might seem less a special water management concern than a natural and permanent condition. That an area is generally desert, however, with a warm, arid-semiarid climate does not mean it is afflicted with drought. Usually enough precipitation falls in the state to support a thriving desert ecosystem, with its varied flora and fauna, all adapted to dry conditions.
    • Arroyo Vol. 5 No. 1 (April 1991)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991-04)
      Efforts are currently underway to establish regional water supply agencies to serve two Arizona urban areas: Tucson and Phoenix. Already authorized by the state Legislature, the Tucson Active Management Area Water Augmentation Authority (TWAA) is in the final process of being formed. Meanwhile, the Arizona Legislature is currently considering legislation to authorize a Phoenix Groundwater Replenishment District (PGRD) to serve the Phoenix Active Management Area.
    • Arroyo Vol. 5 No. 2 (June 1991)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991-06)
      Washes and arroyos cut or carve patterns into desert surfaces and are as much a natural form of the Arizona landscape as serrated mountains. Meandering over much of the desert, their crevices help make up the texture and shape of desert lands. Indeed, even in developed and urbanized desert areas, washes and arroyos often remain a conspicuous feature, a natural remnant within the urban fabric.
    • Arroyo Vol. 5 No. 3 (October 1991)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991-10)
      Because Arizona's small water systems are of lesser size than major water companies, they should not therefore be viewed as relatively simple, uncomplicated operations. Despite a smaller scale - or rather because of it - such systems confront complex situations. These can be extremely difficult to resolve at times, complicating operations and even threatening the existence of some small water systems in the state.