• Arroyo Vol. 5 No. 4 (February 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992-02)
      Someone who is described as the "salt of the earth" is considered to be a goodly person. Salt with earth in this case connotes an unaffected beneficence. Salt with water however has less favorable implications in certain parts of the United States, especially in Arizona and the West. Salt combined with water produces saline water and poses water quality problems in the region.
    • Arroyo Vol. 6 No. 1 (Spring 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992)
      When Loren McIntyre, South American traveler and explorer, asked a Mayoruna Indian where the source of the Amazon River was located, the Indian pointed skyward to the clouds. Advocates of weather modification likewise look to the clouds as a source of water to augment current supplies.
    • Arroyo Vol. 6 No. 2 (Summer 1992)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1992)
      Mostly underground and out of sight, the effects of groundwater over-pumping and declining water tables are difficult for many people to envision, much less conceptualize. The most apparent manifestation of excessive groundwater pumping seems to be the political and public policy debates the issue provokes. In other words, the most obvious effect of groundwater overdraft in Arizona is the Groundwater Management Act.
    • Arroyo Vol. 6 No. 4 (Spring 1993)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1993)
      Tecumseh, Shawnee Chief, expressed bewilderment that intruding whites expected Indians to sell land. "Sell a country!" he exclaimed, "Why not sell the air, the great sea, as well as the earth? Did not the Great Spirit make them all for the use of his children?"
    • Arroyo Vol. 7 No. 3 (April 1993)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1993-04)
    • Arroyo Vol. 7 No. 4 (June 1994)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-06)
      "A fish out of water" is a figure of speech expressing incongruity. At first sight, "Fish farming in the desert" might seem to express a similar sense of dislocation, even futility. But, in fact, fish farming or aquaculture is attracting interest in Arizona. Its supporters, few in number but committed, believe that aquaculture, a field relatively new to the state, has the potential to become a viable Arizona industry.
    • Arroyo Vol. 8 No. 1 (December 1994)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-12)
      According to the Bible, on the second day God gathered the waters so that dry land would appear. Before that time all was surface water. Surface water was all. With the appearance of land, the earth's hydrology became complicated. Groundwater thus formed, and a quandary begotten that challenges hydrologists and lawmakers to this day.
    • Arroyo Vol. 8 No. 2 (April 1995)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-04)
      Self-improvement is as American as apple pie, with wide ranging educational programs abounding throughout the land. The abundance and variety of such educational programs convey a mixed message. Obviously a sentiment is widely shared that there is room for improvement in many areas. At the same time, the existence of these programs represents a sense of optimism that education can remedy troublesome deficiencies and inadequacies.
    • Arroyo Vol. 8 No. 3 (June 1995)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center. (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-06)
      Cliches come easy when the importance of water is discussed. Water is life. Water is destiny. "Whiskey is for drinking and water is to fight over" is an oft used phrase to acknowledge water's more immediate influence, especially in the West. Many speakers have proclaimed that water is a driving force in western politics and a wave upon which much of the economic activities of the region rise and fall. In short, water is pretty important stuff.
    • Arroyo Vol. 8 No. 4 (December 1995)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-12)
      In our democratic form of government, the people or, rather, we, the people, are said to be in charge, the ultimate source of political power. To believe that the people are in control is reassuring, to the extent that we are capable of knowing our best interests. And who among us claims not to know what is best for him or for her?
    • Arroyo Vol. 9 No. 1 (March 1996)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-03)
      Expecting safe, drinkable water to flow from household taps once was an unquestioned assumption. This assumption was founded upon various acts of faith - in progress, technology, and the local water utility. For many people, however, this comforting assumption no longer holds true. We of little faith are becoming wary of tap water, questioning its quality and suspicious of its health effects.
    • Arroyo Vol. 9 No. 2 (June 1996)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-06)
      Those who labor in the water resources field may at times feel their efforts to be slighted. Whereas military glories are marked by public monuments - statues, plaques, a cannon in the park - milestones in water resource developments are represented by laws, public policies, and court decisions. To small boys and most adults, a cannon in the park is more intriguing.
    • Arroyo Vol. 9 No. 3 (October 1996)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-10)
      Because the Endangered Species Act is concerned with the effects of human activities on the natural environment, the law covers a lot of ground, both real and figurative. It can regulate large geographic areas of desert, mountains and forests, as well as have wide legal implications affecting a range of human activities: political, social, economic, and cultural.
    • Arroyo Vol. 9 No. 4 (March 1997)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-03)
      Consider the phrase "constructed wetlands." Although not a contradiction in terms, the two words make up an unlikely combination. Construction implies a project fabricated and built by humans. What then has construction to do with wetlands, natural areas formed by the complex workings of geology, biology and hydrology?
    • Arroyo Vol. 10 No. 2 (March 1998)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-03)
      Many U.S. citizens believe that thanks to our advanced technology and enlightened public policy we can consume without risk the food and water that are readily available to most of us, as citizens of a rich and privileged country. Some of those who subscribe to this buoyant and comforting attitude, however, may have lately experienced second thoughts. Because of various recent and widely reported incidents, many people are feeling concern about the quality and safety of our food and water. This is not surprising; some of these incidents have resulted in serious, widespread sickness, even death.
    • Arroyo Vol. 10 No. 4 (December 1999)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-12)
      Recently very much center stage and in the spotlight, water conservation seems to be an idea whose time has come. If, however, we define water conservation as the careful use of water to better maintain current supplies, then water conservation is not a recent development. What is relatively new is our current perception of water conservation.
    • Arroyo Vol. 11 No. 1 (May 2002)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-05)
      When the state’s urban dwellers think of rural water resources – if they think of them at all – they most likely think of recreational opportunities, like fishing, boating and camping. Residents of rural areas of the state, however, are confronting a wide range of water issues, with ensuring sufficient supplies being the most critical issue. The rural water management strategy that is adopted must reflect the physical, social and cultural characteristics unique to the non-urban regions of Arizona.
    • Arroyo Vol. 7 No. 1 (Summer 1993)

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1993)
      Conserve, reuse and augment summarize Arizona's strategy to meet new water needs and reduce its reliance on dwindling groundwater reserves. Of the strategic trio, water conservation is an approach utilized by the entire hierarchy of water users, from industrial and agricultural users to individual households using water to cook, grow trees and shrubs, and wash the dog.
    • Arroyo Winter 2007

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Eden, Susanna; Gelt, Joe; Megdal, Sharon; Shipman, Taylor; Smart, Anne; Escobedo, Magdalena (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007)
      Faced with the significant challenge of groundwater overdraft, Arizona adopted groundwater recharge as a water management priority. This 12-page publication discusses early interest in recharge, describing legislative efforts to encourage and regulate projects and identifying significant issues relating to recharge such as water quality implications and control of subsidence as well as focusing on ongoing recharge projects.
    • Arroyo Winter 2008

      University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Eden, Susanna; Gelt, Joe; Lamberton, Melissa (Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008)
      Urbanization, channelization, ground-water depletion, irrigated agriculture, and a variety of other activities have significantly affected many of Arizona's rivers. This 12-page Arroyo issue looks at many river restoration and enhancement projects in Arizona and the issues, partnerships, benefits and water sources characterizing each effort.