• The Effect of Two Surgeons on Operative Time, Anesthesia Time, and Blood Loss in Pediatric Patients with Neuromuscular Scoliosis Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion Surgery

      Cowan, Kirsten; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Shrader, M. Wade (The University of Arizona., 2014-04)
      Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of using a two attending surgeon approach on operative time, anesthesia time, and estimated blood loss in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion surgery. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study of patients with neuromuscular scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion surgery at Phoenix Children’s Hospital in 2011 and 2012. Results Results from 70 patients showed a significant reduction in operative and anesthesia times for patients with two attending surgeons as opposed to one. Mean operative time for the two surgeon group was 3 hours 30 minutes (SD = 49 minutes) and was significantly shorter than 4 hours 26 minutes (SD = 1 hour 22 minutes), the mean operative time for the one surgeon group, t (56) =3.44, p = .001. Mean anesthesia time for the two surgeon group was 5 hours 28 minutes (SD = 55 minutes) and was significantly shorter than 6 hours 9 minutes (SD = 1 hour 28 minutes), the mean anesthesia time for the one surgeon group, t (57) = -2.34, p = .023. There was no significant difference in estimated blood loss found between the groups. The mean blood loss for the two surgeon group was 1202.1 ml( SD = 1033.1) versus 1042.1 ml (SD = 959.41) for the one surgeon group, t(68) = .671, p = .50. This pattern of results remained the same in subgroup analysis designed to compare cases with similar severity of presentation. Significance Patients with neuromuscular scoliosis may benefit from a two attending surgeon approach to posterior spinal fusion. More studies are needed to determine modifiable risk factors for excessive blood loss in neuromuscular scoliosis patients as well as to investigate the effect of using a two surgeon approach on specific post-operative complications.