Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDameff, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-16T22:40:31Z
dc.date.available2014-04-16T22:40:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/315899
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background: Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. Telephone CPR (TCPR) comprises CPR instruction given by emergency dispatchers to bystanders responding to OHCA and the CPR performed as a result. TCPR instructions improve bystander CPR rates, but the quality of the instructions varies widely. No standardized system exists to critically evaluate the TCPR intervention. Methods: Investigators developed a novel, standardized system to analyze audio recordings of suspected OHCA calls from a large regional 9-1-1 dispatch center. As the initial step of a TCPR quality improvement initiative, baseline data were obtained from October 2010 to November 2011. Dispatcher recognition of CPR need, delivery of TCPR instructions, and bystander CPR performance were documented. Results: A total of 590 calls were analyzed. CPR was indicated in 317 calls and already in progress in 94. Dispatchers recognized the need for TCPR in 176 of the 223 (79%) remaining calls. CPR instructions were started in 65/223 (29%) and bystander CPR resulting from TCPR instructions was started in 31/223 (14%). Median time intervals were: recognition of CPR need [69s (IQR: 44, 104.5)], initiation of CPR instructions [175s (IQR: 139, 207)], and first chest compression [251s (IQR: 189, 306)]. Conclusion: It is feasible to employ a simple data collection and reporting system for critical evaluation of the TCPR intervention. A standardized methodology for measuring TCPR is necessary to perform on-going quality improvement, to establish performance standards, and for future research on how to optimize bystander CPR rates and OHCA survival.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshTelephoneen
dc.subject.meshCardiopulmonary Resuscitationen
dc.titleA Standardized Template for Measuring and Reporting Telephone Cardiopulmonary Resuscitationen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorBobrow, Bentleyen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T18:13:17Z
html.description.abstractAbstract Background: Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. Telephone CPR (TCPR) comprises CPR instruction given by emergency dispatchers to bystanders responding to OHCA and the CPR performed as a result. TCPR instructions improve bystander CPR rates, but the quality of the instructions varies widely. No standardized system exists to critically evaluate the TCPR intervention. Methods: Investigators developed a novel, standardized system to analyze audio recordings of suspected OHCA calls from a large regional 9-1-1 dispatch center. As the initial step of a TCPR quality improvement initiative, baseline data were obtained from October 2010 to November 2011. Dispatcher recognition of CPR need, delivery of TCPR instructions, and bystander CPR performance were documented. Results: A total of 590 calls were analyzed. CPR was indicated in 317 calls and already in progress in 94. Dispatchers recognized the need for TCPR in 176 of the 223 (79%) remaining calls. CPR instructions were started in 65/223 (29%) and bystander CPR resulting from TCPR instructions was started in 31/223 (14%). Median time intervals were: recognition of CPR need [69s (IQR: 44, 104.5)], initiation of CPR instructions [175s (IQR: 139, 207)], and first chest compression [251s (IQR: 189, 306)]. Conclusion: It is feasible to employ a simple data collection and reporting system for critical evaluation of the TCPR intervention. A standardized methodology for measuring TCPR is necessary to perform on-going quality improvement, to establish performance standards, and for future research on how to optimize bystander CPR rates and OHCA survival.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Dameff_Christian_Thesis.pdf
Size:
658.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Thesis
Thumbnail
Name:
Dameff_Christian_Poster.pdf
Size:
385.8Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Poster

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record