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dc.contributor.advisorGilliland, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKugler, Tamaren_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Jennifer Susan
dc.creatorAnderson, Jennifer Susanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T22:00:09Z
dc.date.available2014-05-13T22:00:09Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/316780
dc.description.abstractPerceptions of greed permeate the popular business and management environment, yet the scholarly literature in these areas has given scant attention to greed and perceptions of greed. In three laboratory studies, I investigated both the antecedents and consequences of perceived greed. Contrary to a number of literatures' treatment of greed as simply a synonym for selfishness, I proposed that the three antecedents of perceived greed are distributive injustice, inference of a selfish motive to acquire, and relative deprivation. I then explored four key outcomes of perceived of greed: personal anger, moral outrage, punishment behaviors, and social distancing behaviors. Results demonstrated that perceptions of greed are formed when an individual experiences a distributive injustice, combined with an inference of a selfish motive to acquire, and that each of personal anger, moral outrage, punishment behaviors and social distancing are consequences of perceiving others as greedy. Relative deprivation contributed to perceptions of greed, but in a manner different from the hypothesized model.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectOrganizational Justiceen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectGreeden_US
dc.titleSelfish, Excessive, Greedy: The Psychological Causes and Consequences of Perceptions of Greeden_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilliland, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKugler, Tamaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Jerelen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T11:39:46Z
html.description.abstractPerceptions of greed permeate the popular business and management environment, yet the scholarly literature in these areas has given scant attention to greed and perceptions of greed. In three laboratory studies, I investigated both the antecedents and consequences of perceived greed. Contrary to a number of literatures' treatment of greed as simply a synonym for selfishness, I proposed that the three antecedents of perceived greed are distributive injustice, inference of a selfish motive to acquire, and relative deprivation. I then explored four key outcomes of perceived of greed: personal anger, moral outrage, punishment behaviors, and social distancing behaviors. Results demonstrated that perceptions of greed are formed when an individual experiences a distributive injustice, combined with an inference of a selfish motive to acquire, and that each of personal anger, moral outrage, punishment behaviors and social distancing are consequences of perceiving others as greedy. Relative deprivation contributed to perceptions of greed, but in a manner different from the hypothesized model.


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