Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBrucks, Merrieen_US
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Kevin P.*
dc.creatorNewman, Kevin P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-06T22:30:00Z
dc.date.available2014-06-06T22:30:00Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/320000
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about how corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts affect consumer behavior outcomes that are not ultimately tied back to the firm (e.g., corporate financial performance). This dissertation addresses that gap in the literature by examining the influence of CSR behavior on the moral behavior of consumers. Findings from this dissertation demonstrate that some consumers vicariously balance their moral behavior against a brand's CSR efforts. For instance, I show that a brand's more socially responsible behavior can negatively influence the moral behavior of consumers (i.e., vicarious moral licensing effect) while a brand's less socially responsible behavior can positively influence the moral behavior of consumers (i.e., vicarious moral cleansing effect). However, these effects are limited to those consumers who have extended their psychological self to a brand conducting the CSR efforts. A series of five studies tests the proposed vicarious moral balancing effect, highlights boundary conditions of this effect, and demonstrates the process by which the vicarious moral licensing effect occurs. Study 1 demonstrates the vicarious moral balancing effect in the generosity behavior of consumers while study 2 extends these effects to the cheating behavior of consumers. Studies 3 and 4 find that making consumers more mindful of their moral decision making and behavior eliminates and even reverses earlier findings showing the negative influence of CSR behavior on the moral behavior of consumers. Study 5 demonstrates a potential process explanation for the vicarious moral licensing effect by showing that CSR behavior framed as goal commitment increases positive moral consumer behavior while CSR behavior framed as goal progress decreases positive moral consumer behavior. Implications, contributions, and limitations of these findings and directions for future areas of research are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCorporate Social Responsibilityen_US
dc.subjectMoral Behavioren_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectBrand Relationshipsen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Corporate Social Responsibility Efforts on the Moral Behavior of Consumersen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLusch, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNielsen, Jesperen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStone, Jeffen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-11T23:01:30Z
html.description.abstractLittle is known about how corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts affect consumer behavior outcomes that are not ultimately tied back to the firm (e.g., corporate financial performance). This dissertation addresses that gap in the literature by examining the influence of CSR behavior on the moral behavior of consumers. Findings from this dissertation demonstrate that some consumers vicariously balance their moral behavior against a brand's CSR efforts. For instance, I show that a brand's more socially responsible behavior can negatively influence the moral behavior of consumers (i.e., vicarious moral licensing effect) while a brand's less socially responsible behavior can positively influence the moral behavior of consumers (i.e., vicarious moral cleansing effect). However, these effects are limited to those consumers who have extended their psychological self to a brand conducting the CSR efforts. A series of five studies tests the proposed vicarious moral balancing effect, highlights boundary conditions of this effect, and demonstrates the process by which the vicarious moral licensing effect occurs. Study 1 demonstrates the vicarious moral balancing effect in the generosity behavior of consumers while study 2 extends these effects to the cheating behavior of consumers. Studies 3 and 4 find that making consumers more mindful of their moral decision making and behavior eliminates and even reverses earlier findings showing the negative influence of CSR behavior on the moral behavior of consumers. Study 5 demonstrates a potential process explanation for the vicarious moral licensing effect by showing that CSR behavior framed as goal commitment increases positive moral consumer behavior while CSR behavior framed as goal progress decreases positive moral consumer behavior. Implications, contributions, and limitations of these findings and directions for future areas of research are discussed.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_13270_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
1.340Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record