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dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-13T23:15:43Z
dc.date.available2015-03-13T23:15:43Z
dc.date.issued2015-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/346609
dc.descriptionRevised 02/2015; Originally published: 2000.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe most important disease of woody dicotyledonous plants in Arizona is Phymatotrichopsis root rot (Cotton or Texas root rot) caused by a unique and widely distributed soil-borne fungus, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. The fungus is indigenous to the alkaline, low-organic matter soils of the southwestern United States and central and northern Mexico.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Service and Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin AZ1150en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectroot roten_US
dc.subjectPhymatotrichopsisen_US
dc.subjectdiseaseen_US
dc.subjectfungusen_US
dc.subjectcottonen_US
dc.subjectplantsen_US
dc.subjectplant diseasesen_US
dc.subjectcotton root roten_US
dc.titleCotton (Texas) Root Roten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeBooken_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T12:25:44Z
html.description.abstractThe most important disease of woody dicotyledonous plants in Arizona is Phymatotrichopsis root rot (Cotton or Texas root rot) caused by a unique and widely distributed soil-borne fungus, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. The fungus is indigenous to the alkaline, low-organic matter soils of the southwestern United States and central and northern Mexico.


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