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dc.contributor.advisorKeith, Ladden
dc.contributor.authorClements, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-14T23:43:37Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-14T23:43:37Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-14en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/552905en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstoneen
dc.description.abstractThe subject matter of this report regards the overall efficiency of two University of Arizona Dormitories from a cost, energy, materials, and construction techniques point of view. Essential to this study was also the social habits of residents within the dormitories, and how they effected the energy use. The two dormitories are considered “pre – LEED” as they were built prior to the recent certification system. Both Manzanita – Mohave, and Coronado Residence Halls were examined in a case study, and interview with the Director of Residence Life, Alex Blandeburgo. In the case study portion, the dormitories’ refrigeration, electricity, steam, and water consumption rates were investigated and compared. These 4 energy types were then looked at from a cost perspective. Lastly, the use of sustainable materials was compared, as well as the construction techniques, and design of each dormitory, and how this could affect social habits, as well as energy use in the dorms. There were some very interesting findings that can be taken from this report. To begin, Manzanita – Mohave was deemed the more sustainable dorm, as its overall energy consumption rates per square foot were much lower than Coronado’s (refrigeration, steam, electricity, and water). In addition to this, Manzi – Mo had less of a cost burden on energy, and its construction methods facilitated less energy use. Additionally, the social habits of Coronado’s residents seem to favor much higher energy uses, which were attributed to their response to the construction methods of the Coronado. These essential results and theories were supported by the experiences of Alex Blandeburgo, and quintessentially mean that a residence hall’s energy efficiency is effected more by the residents that live in it and their habits, rather than its construction techniques, or LEED certification.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizonaen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectEnergy efficiencyen
dc.subjectSustainable Buildingen
dc.titleCampus Sustainability Case Study: Analyzing the energy use, cost efficiency, materials, and construction methods of two campus dormitories, and investigating what causes these differences.en_US
dc.typetext (PDF)en
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameSustainable Built Environmentsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en
dc.contributor.mentorLynn, Charlieen
dc.contributor.instructorKeith, Ladd, Iuliano, Joeyen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-07T04:47:57Z
html.description.abstractThe subject matter of this report regards the overall efficiency of two University of Arizona Dormitories from a cost, energy, materials, and construction techniques point of view. Essential to this study was also the social habits of residents within the dormitories, and how they effected the energy use. The two dormitories are considered “pre – LEED” as they were built prior to the recent certification system. Both Manzanita – Mohave, and Coronado Residence Halls were examined in a case study, and interview with the Director of Residence Life, Alex Blandeburgo. In the case study portion, the dormitories’ refrigeration, electricity, steam, and water consumption rates were investigated and compared. These 4 energy types were then looked at from a cost perspective. Lastly, the use of sustainable materials was compared, as well as the construction techniques, and design of each dormitory, and how this could affect social habits, as well as energy use in the dorms. There were some very interesting findings that can be taken from this report. To begin, Manzanita – Mohave was deemed the more sustainable dorm, as its overall energy consumption rates per square foot were much lower than Coronado’s (refrigeration, steam, electricity, and water). In addition to this, Manzi – Mo had less of a cost burden on energy, and its construction methods facilitated less energy use. Additionally, the social habits of Coronado’s residents seem to favor much higher energy uses, which were attributed to their response to the construction methods of the Coronado. These essential results and theories were supported by the experiences of Alex Blandeburgo, and quintessentially mean that a residence hall’s energy efficiency is effected more by the residents that live in it and their habits, rather than its construction techniques, or LEED certification.


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