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dc.contributor.authorFreeman, C. Edward
dc.contributor.authorReid, William H.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-19T16:21:38Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-19T16:21:38Zen
dc.date.issued1985en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/554210en
dc.description.abstractAgave lechuguilla Torr. is a small, widespread century plant characteristic of the Chihuahuan Desert growing from central Mexico to southern New Mexico. Most reproduction is vegetative. Flowering occurs primarily in May and June. The inflorescence shaft grows as rapidly as 2 dm/day, and reaches full height (about 2.6 m) in three to four weeks. Energy for flowering is stored almost entirely in the leaves. Flowers open in late afternoon, and last for approximately 96 hours. Anthers dehisce 24 hours after a flower opens and the stigma becomes receptive at approximately 66 hours. Nectar is produced during the second and third nights. The anatomy of the flower is of interest in that the pollen tubes do not penetrate tissue but have an unobstructed path to the ovules. The species is capable of self-pollination, but not apomixis.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleAspects of the Reproductive Biology of Agave lechuguilla Torr.en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at El Pasoen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-07T21:47:56Z
html.description.abstractAgave lechuguilla Torr. is a small, widespread century plant characteristic of the Chihuahuan Desert growing from central Mexico to southern New Mexico. Most reproduction is vegetative. Flowering occurs primarily in May and June. The inflorescence shaft grows as rapidly as 2 dm/day, and reaches full height (about 2.6 m) in three to four weeks. Energy for flowering is stored almost entirely in the leaves. Flowers open in late afternoon, and last for approximately 96 hours. Anthers dehisce 24 hours after a flower opens and the stigma becomes receptive at approximately 66 hours. Nectar is produced during the second and third nights. The anatomy of the flower is of interest in that the pollen tubes do not penetrate tissue but have an unobstructed path to the ovules. The species is capable of self-pollination, but not apomixis.


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