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dc.contributor.advisorRaval, Sureshen
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Reena
dc.creatorThomas, Reenaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-27T01:00:29Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-27T01:00:29Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/555838en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is concerned with the gendered discourse of nation and home where women carry the symbolic duty of holders of a pure, uncontaminated culture passively confined to the domestic space. I consider two commonplace tropes, the woman-as-nation metaphor and the Victorian angel in the house, both of which convey a limited view of women's agency and her significance in simultaneously resisting and ratifying patriarchal visions of nation and gender. The novels in this study document various phases of nation building under periods of colonialism and postcolonialism, and each features the plight of women affected by the realities of sham democracies and political instability. My analysis rests on the claim that postcolonial authors continue the inquiries into the ironic and futile foundations on which nation and identity is built which define modernist despair. I assert the value in understanding how women respond to disillusionment across cultures in an attempt to recover the experience of women and her political consciousness, granting a relevance to the role women play in textual deliberations on political skepticism and political idealism often reserved for male actors.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.subjectmodernismen
dc.subjectnationalismen
dc.subjectpostcolonialismen
dc.subjectrepresentationen
dc.subjectEnglishen
dc.subjectBritishen
dc.titleKILLING THE `ANGEL IN THE HOUSE': THE REPRESENTATION OF WOMEN AND NATION BUILDING IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY ENGLISH AND POSTCOLONIAL POLITICAL FICTIONen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberRaval, Sureshen
dc.contributor.committeememberMonsman, Geralden
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper Alarcón, Danielen
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
dc.description.admin-noteRestricted upon submission; 26-May-2015 / kcen_US
html.description.abstractThis dissertation is concerned with the gendered discourse of nation and home where women carry the symbolic duty of holders of a pure, uncontaminated culture passively confined to the domestic space. I consider two commonplace tropes, the woman-as-nation metaphor and the Victorian angel in the house, both of which convey a limited view of women's agency and her significance in simultaneously resisting and ratifying patriarchal visions of nation and gender. The novels in this study document various phases of nation building under periods of colonialism and postcolonialism, and each features the plight of women affected by the realities of sham democracies and political instability. My analysis rests on the claim that postcolonial authors continue the inquiries into the ironic and futile foundations on which nation and identity is built which define modernist despair. I assert the value in understanding how women respond to disillusionment across cultures in an attempt to recover the experience of women and her political consciousness, granting a relevance to the role women play in textual deliberations on political skepticism and political idealism often reserved for male actors.


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