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dc.contributor.advisorMendoza-Denton, Norma C.en
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, Dana
dc.creatorOsborne, Danaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-12T16:58:30Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-12T16:58:30Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/556859en
dc.description.abstractAfter nearly 400 years of colonial occupation by Spain, the Philippine Islands were signed over to the United States in the 1898 Treaty of Paris along with other Spanish colonies, Guam and Puerto Rico. The American acquisition of the Philippine archipelago marked the beginning of rapid linguistic, social and political transformations that have been at the center of life in the Philippines for the last century, characterized by massive swings in national language policy, the structuration of the modern educational system, political reorganizations and increased involvement in the global economy. The rapid expansion of "education-for-all" during the American Period (1898-1946) set the foundation for the role of education in daily life and created a nation of multilinguals - contemporarily, most people speak, at the very least, functional English and Filipino (official and national languages, respectively) in conjunction with their L1 (mother tongue), of which there are an estimated 170 living varieties throughout the island array. This study focuses on the minority language of Ilocano, a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian (Austronesian) language family and is the third largest minority language spoken in the Philippines with over 9 million speakers spread throughout the islands, having a strong literary tradition and a clearly defined ethnolinguistic homeland in the northernmost region of the island of Luzon. The articles contained in this dissertation variously investigate the linguistic, social, and ideological implications of the last century of contact and colonization among speakers of Ilocano and seek to understand why (and how), in light of colonization, missionization, Americanization, and globalization, minority languages like Ilocano have remained robust. Taken together, these analyses shed light on the dynamic interplay between linguistic, social, and ideological processes as they shape contemporary language practices found among Ilocano speakers negotiating the terms of their local and national participation in a continually shifting social, political, and linguistic landscape.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectIlocanoen
dc.subjectLanguage Policyen
dc.subjectMultilingualismen
dc.subjectPhilippinesen
dc.subjectPsycholinguisticsen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectCodeswitchingen
dc.titleNegotiating the Hierarchy of Languages in Ilocandia: The Social and Cognitive Implications of Massive Multilingualism in the Philippinesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberRoth-Gordon, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.committeememberHarley, Heidien
dc.contributor.committeememberSilverstein, Brianen
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Norma C.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 6-Apr-2017en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2017-04-06T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAfter nearly 400 years of colonial occupation by Spain, the Philippine Islands were signed over to the United States in the 1898 Treaty of Paris along with other Spanish colonies, Guam and Puerto Rico. The American acquisition of the Philippine archipelago marked the beginning of rapid linguistic, social and political transformations that have been at the center of life in the Philippines for the last century, characterized by massive swings in national language policy, the structuration of the modern educational system, political reorganizations and increased involvement in the global economy. The rapid expansion of "education-for-all" during the American Period (1898-1946) set the foundation for the role of education in daily life and created a nation of multilinguals - contemporarily, most people speak, at the very least, functional English and Filipino (official and national languages, respectively) in conjunction with their L1 (mother tongue), of which there are an estimated 170 living varieties throughout the island array. This study focuses on the minority language of Ilocano, a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian (Austronesian) language family and is the third largest minority language spoken in the Philippines with over 9 million speakers spread throughout the islands, having a strong literary tradition and a clearly defined ethnolinguistic homeland in the northernmost region of the island of Luzon. The articles contained in this dissertation variously investigate the linguistic, social, and ideological implications of the last century of contact and colonization among speakers of Ilocano and seek to understand why (and how), in light of colonization, missionization, Americanization, and globalization, minority languages like Ilocano have remained robust. Taken together, these analyses shed light on the dynamic interplay between linguistic, social, and ideological processes as they shape contemporary language practices found among Ilocano speakers negotiating the terms of their local and national participation in a continually shifting social, political, and linguistic landscape.


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