• Effects of Instrumentation Recorder time Base Error on Spectral Purity

      Leeke, P. D.; Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)
      Experimental data is presented to show how carrier amplitude of a recorded signal is affected by Time Base Error. Time Base Error effects on the sideband structure of a recorded signal are also shown for different amounts of Time Base Error and at several frequencies. The effect of capstan servo adjustment on spectral purity demonstrates the need for new methods of performance evaluation to achieve optimum performance when recording spectrum information. The data presented shows that skew (ITDE) has little effect on spectral purity for analysis bandwidths of 50 Hz or greater.
    • Analysis of the Modified Integrate and Dump Decision Device

      Quinn, Mathew J., Jr.; Hayre, H. S.; NASA Manned Spacecraft Center; University of Houston (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)
      The purpose of this paper is to describe a system which exhibits better bit error rates for Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) signals than those now used to make the bit decision The system is similar to the popular Integrat6 and Dump device., but it is modified to take advantage of the information contained in the FM "clicks" resulting from the demodulation process to aid in making the proper bit decision. The paper is divided into four parts: First, a brief review of the Integrate and Dump Detector is presented. Then the "click" mechanism is described and such properties of this mechanism as the number of "clicks" in a channel are reviewed. Third, a method of using the information in the "clicks" to one's advantage is discussed. Fourth, and finally, the hardware needed to implement such a system is described in general and certain suggestions are made to improve the over-all decision making capabilities of the system.
    • FM Distortion Caused by Head-to-Tape Spacing

      Hodder, W. K.; Monson, J. E.; Bell & Howell Research Labs; Harvey Mudd College (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)
      Although it is well-known that frequency-modulated waves are distorted by systems with non-uniform frequency response, this distortion is difficult to calculate for most systems. The nature of the head-to-tape spacing transfer function allows the development of a closed form solution for FM distortion. Three methods of processing the voltage off the playback head are considered. Integrating the voltage results in amplitude-frequency distortion, but no harmonic distortion. Taking the voltage either directly off the head or differentiating it give both amplitude-frequency distortion and harmonic distortion. Experiments have verified the theoretical results.
    • L- and S-Band Antenna Calibration Using Cass. A or Cyg. A

      Taylor, Ralph E.; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)
      This paper describes a stellar calibration technique, using the absolute flux density from Cassiopeia A or Cygnus A, to determine effective antenna gain, or system noise temperature, at the IRIG L- and S-band frequencies. Paraboloidal dish antennas, ranging from 20 feet to 85 feet in diameter, can be calibrated using a total-power conventional RF receiver. Previous investigators utilized a Dicke radiometer to perform the same function. It is recommended that the Cass. A and Cyg. A flux densities, known within several tenths of a decibel, be utilized to calibrate IRIG antennas located on the North American Continent. It is demonstrated that Cass. A and Cyg. A provide sufficient signal power to calibrate a 20-foot diameter dish antenna; dish antennas up to 85-feet in diameter may be calibrated without applying a beam correction factor. Precision values of absolute flux density for Cass. A and Cyg. A are given for the 1700-1710 MHz space research, and IRIG 1435-1540 MHz and 2200-2300 MHz bands. An accurate radio sky map is also provided that may be scaled in frequency for the various bands.
    • Instrumentation Systems Engineering Management

      Warren, J. R.; Norton Air Force Base (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)
      Examples of practical, effective, tools for the management of systems engineering have been presented. The usage of those tools is further examined. Management, as used here, pertains to the technical management of the systems engineering Job. The techniques described are structured around a medium/large data transmission/ acquisition/processing system. The principles can be applied to other systems also. Fundamental to the discussion is the use of models, criteria, and selected data for evaluation which results in decisions and program direction for systems optimization.
    • Studies of Life Before Birth

      Mackay, R. Stuart; Boston University Medical School (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)
      By surgical procedures, small physiological monitoring transmitters are placed within the body of fetal animals within the uterus of the mother. After a brief recovery period, various parameters are followed before, during, and after birth, the little animals being born with functioning transmitters already in place. The purpose of such studies is to determine normal values of various cardiovascular parameters in relatively undisturbed subjects and also to follow surgically-produced anatomical and physiological defects which mimic congenital embryologic abnormalities with the goal of learning to cope with these through fetal surgery. Transmission of fetal vectorcardiograms and intrauterine pressure will be described.
    • Appendix A: Telemetering Standards Coordination Committee Report

      Gardenhire, Lawrence W. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1970-10)