• ULTRA LIGHTWEIGHT, LOW COST, TELEMETRY TRACKING SYSTEM

      Sullivan, Arthur; Electro Magnetic Processes, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
      Because of limited budgets, many telemetry applications can not be performed on a real time basis. Consequently, there is a need for a very low cost tracking system. In addition to being inexpensive, the system should be lightweight to minimize building or tower modifications required for installation, and to lower shipping and handling costs. In order to reduce weight and cost, EMP, Inc. has designed an aerodynamically smooth single axis tracking system with a multimode antenna, constructed almost entirely of graphite and utilizing a minimum number of parts. Using this material, the system will be as strong as a conventional system, but will be one half the weight and will be almost temperature insensitive. Furthermore, with the construction technique selected, considerable savings are realized in fabrication costs. Additionally, the step -track technique via a microprocessor controller was selected to eliminate the expensive autotracking feed and all the associated electronic circuitry required for high performance angle tracking. Since a single axis tracking system with a multi-mode antenna can cover a wide variety of missions, an elevation tracking axis is not required. In-close and near overhead passes are covered by the low gain antenna. Switching between the antennas is accomplished automatically based on received signal strength.
    • UPLINK TELEMETRY: A LOGICAL EXPANSION OF FLIGHT TEST DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM CAPABILITIES

      Venorsky, G. W.; McDonnell Aircraft Company (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
      A reliable telemetry uplink, operating simultaneously and compatibly with normal downlink telemetry, will provide the flight test community with a versatile and flexible means of managing airborne data acquisition systems. This paper recommends incorporation of telemetry uplink capabilities into data acquisition systems employed in aircraft developmental flight testing. Potential applications are discussed, including: • In-flight real-time, reformatting of an airborne data system. • Time code synchronization. • Merging of external data sources into onboard data streams. • Presentation of ground processed data to the pilot via cockpit displays. • In-flight programming of flight-test-peculiar equipments, e.g. flutter excitation controllers. Reduced downlink telemetry bandwidths, higher mission productivities, and decreased pilot workloads are expected benefits. The results of an ongoing, McDonnell Aircraft Company, (MCAIR), funded (IRAD*) uplink development and evaluation program are presented, including the ground-based segments integrated into an autotracking antenna system. Alternatives also are discussed for integration of telemetry uplink systems into normally used test facilities, contractor and government operated.
    • THE USE OF THE CONICAL SCAN EARTH SENSOR IN COMMUNICATION SATELLITE APPLICATIONS

      Fowler, Robert Z.; ITHACO, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
      Infra-red horizon sensors are almost universally used as the primary attitude sensor for pitch and roll on present day three-axis stabilized communication satellites. When used with a momentum wheel, yaw is also controlled without direct sensing. The application flexibility of the mechanically scanned Conical Earth Sensor, and it’s recent availability as a component designed for precision, long life performance have resulted in renewed interest in its use on communication satellites. The Conical Earth Sensor will provide accurate on-orbit attitude sensing in pitch and roll. It can provide attitude sensing all the way from the shuttle orbit to synchronous for booster control, and is particularly attractive for multiple burn, multiple orbit transfer. It can provide accurate nadir sensing 100% of the time in the highly elliptical Molniya twelvehour orbit. It can facilitate wide angle attitude sensing for antennae calibration maneuvers. It can be used in a static mode as a horizon crossing indicator for spacecraft that go up as spinners, and then for normal on-orbit sensing as a scanner. It can be readily hardened to both nuclear and lazer threats, unlike static sensors that are highly susceptible to thermal transients. It has a simple, rugged, and stable construction that is not sensitive to resonance effects from other mechanical devices on the spacecraft such as momentum or reaction wheels.
    • VARIABLE DATA BIT RATES WITH A FIXED HOP RATE NONCOHERENT FH/MFSK SYSTEM

      Omura, Jim K.; School of Engineering and Applied Science Los Angeles (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
    • VIDEO BASED INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNIQUES FOR MERGING DATA INTO VIDEO

      Keller, P.; Naval Weapon Center (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
      A need is shown for the development of standardization in data into video encoders and decoders for instrumentation systems. Features such a standardized system should have are listed and discussed based on the authors experience with video instrumentation systems at the Naval Weapons Center and as a consultant.
    • VLSI IN MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS

      Cuccia, C. Louis; Ford Aerospace and Communications Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
    • WORD ERROR PERFORMANCE OF VITERBI AND TAILBITING DECODERS

      King, M. A.; The Aerospace Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
    • WWMCCS SPACE ASSETS; CONTRIBUTORS TO A TOTAL SYSTEM

      Coyle, James; The MITRE Corporation (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
      This paper outlines the roles of satellite systems in the context of the overall WWMCCS mission. It describes the types of operational interdependencies that exist between ground elements and the satellites of space systems and proposes that, because of these interdependencies, equal consideration of the survivability of ground elements must be included in system planning in order to capitalize on the contribution of space assets to the WWMCCS mission.
    • ZERO OVERHEAD PCM SYNC

      Veillard, Dominique H.; Spin Physics, Inc. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 1981-10)
      In the past decades, spectacular advances in the technologies related to signal processing have driven the cost effectiveness of digital systems to new levels of practicality, in spite of the theoretical complexity inherent in the process. The following is a description of a novel way of alleviating altogether one element of the complexity of a digital audio or video channel, thereby yielding code bandwidth reduction and recording medium economy as well as cost savings in the implementation of the electronic circuits. A prototype circuit operating according to this principle has been demonstrated to work satisfactorily while providing overall system simplification. The configuration of the new sync detector circuit lends itself well to implementation by integrated circuit techniques.